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Full text of "Weymouth High School/Technical High School yearbook"


AND NOW TOMORROW 




Cl*u. 4 1945 
ft ft 




Class Colors 
BLUE AND SILVER 

Class Motto 

AND NOW TOMORROW 



Published by Students of WEYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 
Wei mot i ii, M vssachusi i rs 



THE TUFTS LIBRARY 
WEYMOUTH, MASS. 



DEDICATION 

ith humble gratitude toward, those 
who have already made the supreme sacri' 
fice, and our heartfelt prayers for the success 
and safe return of those who are fighting or 
soon will be fighting, we dedicate this year 
book of the Class of 1945 to Weymouth 
High's fighting men throughout the world. 




Four Year High Honors 

Edward Paul Dalto Lorraine Jeannette Voigt 

Jean Carolyn Huntress Mabel Alice Whaley 



Four Year Honors 



Lois Helen Aberdeen 
Wendell Lylc Baglow 
Alfio Bongarzone 
Paul Edwin Bowker 
Barbara Frances Bragole 
Marie Elizabeth Burkett 
Ethel Burrow 
Olga Chroniak 
Earl Gerard Comeau 
Marguerite Anne Corbo 
David William Cuff 
Carol Amy Curtis 
Jeanne Alice Davis 
June Louise deW^lloughby 



John Thomas Donovan 
Eugene Rule Dunn 
Ingrid Margreta Fallgren 
Barbara Jane Freeman 
Claire Margaret Heaver 
Kenneth William Heger 
Priscilla Ann Hilliard 
Jacqueline Jordan 
William Eugene Leinonen 
Elinore Rose MacDonald 
Anne Mane McGovern 
Alfred Michael Sheehy 
Donald Harrison Sylvia 
Iren" Mary Weisslinger 
Norman Herbert Whittle 



Members of the Class of 1945 
who left during the Senior Year and are now in 
the Armed Services of the United States 



Richard Sargent Bates 
Robert Willard Bond 
Richard Irving Brigham 
Robert James Casey, Jr. 
Joseph. Everett Clohosscy 
Joseph Everett Covency 
John Arthur Culver 



Paul James MacKenzie 
Roy Victor Nelson 
William Panora 
Robert Sanger Petze 
Frederic Milton Sargent 
Edward William Sullivan, Jr. 
John Joseph Sullivan 





Contents 



Dedication 


5 


Four- Year Honor Roll 


6 


Faculty 


8 


Class Officers 


10 


Vocational Officers 


11 


Class Census 


12 


Class History 


13 


Class Prophecy 


23 


High Honor Essays 


35 


Senior Who's Who 


43 


The Perfect Senior 


66 


Class Activities 


67 


Class Will 


82 


Advertisements 


85 



Faculty 

it 



WALLACE L. WHITTLE, Principal 

Fairness and dependability arc only a few of 
his good qualities. 

THOMAS A. LYONS, Assistant Principal 
The man with the big heart. 

FRANCIS K. WHIPPLE, Vocational Director 
"Well, young man. what's your difficulty?" 

RAY G. PARKER, Vocational Assistant Director 
A friend like him is hard to find. 

MARY M. I AMBI-.. Secretary 

Intelligence, beaut), and personality, all in one 
package. 

MARION R. FORTIER. Secretary 
Her quiet manner and nature mild. 

RUTH E. GILLIS, Assistant Secretary 
Intelligence isn't her only virtue. 

LEWIS H. BACON, Jr., Auto Mechanics 
"Are yon working? Well, keep oil the bench." 

ESTHER L. BENSON, Home Economics 
The proof of the pudding is in the eating. 

JAMES F. BOLAM), Sheet Metal 

"All right! All right! A little less noise." 

PRESCOTT B. BROWN, English 

Vim, vigor, and vitality, all wrapped up in one. 

I). EVERE1 I BRYAN, Auto Mechanics 
"Where's Thurston? Out having another butt?" 

ERNES' I INI. R. CANNING. French 
A good disposition is a rare gift. 

HAROLD E. CLARKE. Sheet Metal 
"Comprenez-vous?" 

HELEN A. CHASE, English 

There is no royal road to education. 

JOHN K. 1)E LA HUNT, Ancient History, 
Economics, Science 
Though his look may be stei n, his manner is 
gentle. 

HARRY F. DUNCAN, Printing 
"You are coming in tonight, and don't forget it." 

BEATRICE ESCOTT, Domeslric .Iris 
Quiet, (aim. and reserved. 

ALICE K. FAY, Commercial 

A light lo guide, a lod to check the erring and 
i eprO\ c'd. 

ELEANOR FREEMAN, Librarian 
Always ready and willing to help. 



JOHN T. GANNON, Latin 
"Latin is a language 
As dead as dead can be. 
It killed the ancient Romans. 
And now it's killing me." 

JOHN T. GHIORSE, Aviation, Mathematics 
His shyness docs no( outshine his brilliance. 

WALTER C. (.I l l ERSON, Guidance 
Macaulay and Livy aren't his only friends. 

OLIVE E. HACkl. I I . Comma, ml 
She never lacks energy . 

HOWARD H. HA WEE Y, Auto Mechanics, 
Me< hanical Drawing 
"Come on! Lets go." 

RUSSELL H. (ACE. Musk 

He not only has the knowledge of music, but 
also t he ability to teac h it . 

LILLIAN JEF I S. Spanish 

Her ways are ways ol helpfulness; 
Her paths arc paths of friendliness.. 

PHILIP T. JONES, Social Science 

The man who makes hard things easy is the edu- 
cator. 

RITA M. JONES. English, Ancient History, 
Mathematics, Science. Social Science 
With modest dignity and calm content. 

JEAN C. KYHN, Sheet Metal 

"Get away from the window and slop looking at 
the girls." 

MARGARET K. LANGFORD, Commercial 
Accuracy is her password. 

CLARENCE R. IA ONI), Science 

He makes science interesting and enjoyable. 

HELEN G. LYONS. English, Ancient History 
Always a smile for everyone. 

DOROTHY G. MacGREGOR, Commercial 
Few have sum a good disposition. 

OTTO H. MAHN, Citizenship, Economic. 

Mathematics, Physical Education, Placeme nt 
"Give me the ball and gel in line.' 

JOHN F. MARTIN, Social Science 

More is to be gained from him than from any 
two books. 

RU I II E. MAYO, Science 
One can rely on steadiness. 



PAGIi EIGHT 



RUSSELL H. MAZZOLA, Aviation, Mathematics 
A good nature brightens everything. 

GEORGE ]. McCAR I HY, Social Science 
C.;ist awa) sorrow and care. I h<'\ <li> no good. 

MARY E. McMORROW, English, Mathematics 
llci intelligence and friendliness make hei .1 
Eriend to all. 

ROBERT E. MITCHELL, Science, Social Science 
I horough is his vvat< li word. 

DOROTHY l ! . MURPHY, English, Ancient 
History, Mathematit > 
I'.i 1 it it'll ( \ is the key to suites*. 

HAROLD R. NELSON, Agriculture 
Quiet and through. 

HILMER S. NELSON, Head o) Agriculture 
A skilled exponent of mankinds oldest art and 
science. 

[ALMAR N. NELSON, Aviation, Mathematics, 
"Come on, lellous. quiet down." 
"Sit thee down or thee will have time." 

HELEN M. NORRIS, Commercial 
Humor seasoned with wit. 

VIRGINIA NYE, Guidance 
She deserves everyone's friendship, and gets it. 

CHARLOTTE M. OPPLER, (Mrs.) French, 
German 

The quiet mind is richer than a crown. 

ORAL A. PAGE, Physical Education 
Actions speak louder than words. 

DOROTHY PEARSON, English, Social Science 
I he definition ol a good sport. 

DOROTHY L. PETERSON, Physical Education 
Eull of spirit, pep, and fun. 

ANITA L. PETRUCCI, English, French 
A gentle heart. 

BARBARA H. PRAY, Ancient History 
The secret ot success is constancy of purpose. 

MARION L. RAY, (Mrs.) Commercial 
She has a charming personality, and is helpful 
and friendl) . 



VL\ Ml RAYMOND, Mathematics, Science 
It's wisdom thai makes a man rich. 

MERED1 111 B. RA^ MOND, (Mrs.) English 
I hinkers are as scarce as gold. 

HELENA r. R.EIDY, Latin, Social Science 
I he good and wise lead quiel liwv 

ARTHUR li. SCO I I , Science 
In him friendship ami knowledge abound. 

HAROLD c. SHERWOOD, Cabinetmaking 
"(.rah a broom." 

ROSE SILVERMAN, Commercial 
Pleasant ami helpful , indeed a true friend 

i VELYN SILVESTER, Art 
I he set 1 et of life is art. 

EVA SKALA, Home Economics 
Efficient, methodical, anil wise. 

JAMES F. STEELE. Social Science 
Main friends and no foes. 

GEORGE O. STEWART, Mathematics 

We are not only instructed in math, but also in 
the business of daily living. 

HERBERTA L. STOCKWELL, Nurse 

Never pin oil till tomorrow what von can th> 
today. 

WALDO II. SWAN, Mathematics 
Everybody's friend, nobody's enemy. 

PAUL SWEENEY, JR., Coach 

"All that tan be asked of you is your best." 

MARY F. TOOMEY, Englisli 
She is wise who speaks little. 

MARTHA VINING, Latin 

Experience combined with common sense. 

ALICE WHITE, English 
Energetic and smiling all the while. 

JOSEPH K. WHITTEMORE, English, History 
"It's your mark; kick it around." 

M. JEAN YOUNG, Commercial 
There is no limit to her abilities. 



On Leave of Absence in Military Service 

HARRY ARLANSON. Navy 
PAUL C. CLEAVES, Army 
GERALDINE R. COLLIGAN, Navy 
•CATHERINE M. HALE. Navy 
FRANCIS X. KELLY, Army 
GEORGE H. KLAY, Navy 
NORMAN 1). LOUD, Army 
JAMES H. POLLARD, Jr., Army 



PAGE NINE 



1945 




1945 



RICHARD STEIN, President 




PRISCILLA HILLIARI), Secretary 



PAGli TEN ^ 




GEORGE LABADIE 

f^V, PAGE ELEVEN 



Class Census 



Most Popular Gil 1 


Priscilla Hilliard 


Most Popular Boy 


Richard Stein 


Witt iest 


Francis Slattery 


Prettiest 


Claire Heaver 


Class Athlete 


Joseph Coveney 


Class Comedian 


Richard Cote 


Class Bookworm 


Lester Currier 


Class Musician 


Donald Sylvia 


Class Baby 


Eugene Dunn 


Class Actress 


Jane Poison 


Class Heartbreaker 


Frank Gilcreast 


Most Dependable 


Irene Weisslinger 


Most Carefree 


Dolly Kunz 


Best Dressed Girl 


Betty Gannon 


Best Dressed Boy 


Albert Healey 


Class Sheik 


Albert Healey 


Woman Hater 


William Leinonen 


Most Popular with the Men 


Barbara Kelley 


Most Popular with the Ladies 


Francis Slattery 


Class Poet 


Constance Tedesco 


Class Artist 


Richard Cote 



PAGE TWELVE ^ 



Class History Committee 

ft 



BARBARA SAMPSON, Chairman, 218 

THOMAS LEARV, 217 

ALFRED SHEEHY, 21S 

JACQUELINE JORDAN. 216 

LOIS ABERDEEN, 211 

MICHAEL HYNES, 216 

EDNA LEONARD. 217 

JANE BACON, an 

JOHN DONOV AN, 215 

INGRID FALLGREN, 215 

MABEL WHALEY, 224 

DAVID CUFF, 212 

ETHEL BURROW, 211 

VIRGINIA MATHEWSON, 217 

BARBARA BRAGOLE, 211 

GRACE CARMICHAEL, 212 

ROBERT CULLIVAN, Vocational School 

KENNETH HOWE, Vocational School 

VAUGHAN RALPH, Vocational School 



PAGE FOURTEEN 



Class History 



JVIr. Stein leaned back in his swivel chair, put his Eeet on the desk Before him, 
and drew out his fifty-cent cigars. As usual, he felt like relaxing today. His 
secretary. Priscilla Hilliard, rang. He reached out to press the button. 
"A Mr. Gould to see you, sir," she said. 

"Ah, the new vice-president! Send him right in." Mr. Stein hastily removed his 
feel from the desk. The door opened slowly and a gleam of recognition entered the 
president's eye as a figure entered the room. He jumped from his chair with the 
energy he seldom showed and greeted the man with a hearty handshake. 

"Why, Gouldo!" he exclaimed. "I don't think I've seen you since those good old 
clays at Weymouth High School." A blank look appeared on Mr. Gould's face. He 
look from his pocket a glasses' case and adjusted the spectacles carefully on his nose. 
His face lit up instantly. 

"Dick Stein, you old son of a gun! How are you? Where have you been? What have 
you been doing?" 

"Just a minute," replied Mr. Stein. "Sit down. Have a cigar?" Mr. Gould accepted 
the invitation. He then said: 

"In our freshman year, we learned a lot, didn't we? With the blow of December 
seventh, and the succeeding false alarm air raid of the tenth, we grew up before our 
time; but it didn't rob us of a lot of our fun." 

"Remember when we had that magician show us a few tricks down at the hall?" 

"Yes, I remember," replied Mr. Stein. "I also remember when we had those T-B 
tests. Most of the kids were kind of shaky, but everyone was proud to show his 
wound. 

"We had our pictures taken, too, for the office, starting our record at Weymouth 
High — and a remarkable record it was." 

"Yes, even in our freshman year, we were undefeated in football. They changed 
the ranking system that year, too. Even though the teaching staff, both in the High 
School and the Trade School, was changed by the war, we managed some more ac- 
tivities such as the good musical revue, and the senior play, "Ever since Eve." 

"Yes, but Dick, remember our sophomore year? We had quite a lot of fun then, 
too. As soon as the opening of school, the interest of all W. H. S. students turned to 
the football season. Although the schedule was a hard one, the boys lost only once— 
to Quincy. Among the staunch Maroon raiders were sophomores, Joe Coveney, Bill 
McGurdy, Norman Whittle, and you." 

"Don't forget yourself," interrupted Dick. George went hurriedly on. 

"There was a lot of co-ordination in the basketball team that year, too. Remem- 
ber "Cueball" Coffey, "Al" Sheehy and "Mike" Gorman? They did a swell job." 

"Yes, but the track team really went to town," interrupted Dick. Under the coach- 
ing of Mr. Page, the boys took first place in the annual Inter-Scholastic Meet. The 
winter team even went to New York to compete in the Nationals, where one senior, 



c^V, PAGE FIFTEEN 



Tom Smith, look third place in a dash event. There were a lot of sophomores on that 
squad. 

"We all enjoyed the Senior Play, "Growing Pains," the Senior Prom, and the 
Senior Reception." 

"Remember the Herald-Traveler Spelling Bee?" said George. "Sherrad Fleming 
took to]) honors in that." 

Both men settled themselves more comfortably in their chairs. Each man had his 
own thoughts, his own memories of his high sc hool days. Dick thoughtfully took his 
cigar from his mouth. 

"Say, speaking of the coach, do you remember that skit the football players put on 
of Harry Atkinson's life? I never laughed so much in my life. I can see Gus Peter- 
son now, dressed as a nurse." 

"We did have a lot of fun at the rallies that year. They really made the "Agony 
Quartet," Bill Burdon, Al Bonga/one, Bob Casey, and Don Sylvia, famous. They 
had the whole school almost rolling in the aisles." 

"Winding up the football season with the Athletic Dance and the Bancpiet was 
swell, too. I remember the coach there in Uniform. We all hated to see him go." 

"Don't forget the track team. They won second place in winter track at the state 
meet that year. Mr. Page always did have outstanding teams." 

"We had a good baseball and basketball team also, with the boys in our class tak- 
ing the lead." 

"Sports were not the only activities our class was taking over. Sherrard Fleming, 
Prise ilia Hilliard, Carol Curtis, and Barbara Hearn were elected to Student Council 
that Year; and our class officers were [ohnny Murray, Priscilla Hilliard, and Helen 
Cowett. 

"Don't forget that they elected you vice-president," George said, smiling. "We 
had a swell Junior Party that year. I remember that there were a lot of specialty 
numbers: Polly Barnes reading, Janet Tooze dancing, Eddie Dalto with the electric 
guitar, and lots more. Everyone had fun." 

"We didn't forget the war, though, even in our fun. That was the year the "Wey- 
mouth Highlights" was started. The former students that went to W. H. S., who 
were in the service, really enjoyed hearing news about their old Alma Mater. We 
even purchased a jeep with the fine job we did on the bond drive." 

"The one thing that was really a feat was the time when they made two rooms out 
of 214-A and 214-B, and put an airplane there for the aviation classes. I remember 
that the class of '43 wrote in their class will, epiote, "To rooms 214-A and 214-B, we 
will a few sharp axes to make one 'big happy family.' Their will must have been 
taken seriously." 

"Yes, it was a great year. We all enjoyed the Senior Play, "Woman of Fifteen," 
which was very good. We ended the year well, too, with the Provincetown trip for 
our Junior outing." 

"We started out with a new football coach in our fourth year. Coach Sweeney did 
a good job. Don Cote, Eddie Dalto, Joe Coveney, Jabber Slattery, George Labadie, 
Bill McCurdy, Johnny Butler, Norman Whittle, Johnny Murray, and you and I 



c^v, PAGE SEVENTEEN 



were on the team. Norman Whittle, foe Coveney, and Don Cote received the 
trophies at the Football Banquet." 

"Of course the football season would not be complete without the loyal backing 
of the cheer leaders. Representing the seniors in this swell group of morale boosters 
were Helen Cowett, Peggy Corbo, and Audrey Boyle. They did some dandy cheer- 
leading, not ordy at the games but at the rallies too." 

'Remember how you paced our winter Track Team, Gouldo, the lime we won 
State 'B' Championship? That was another leather in the crown of our class." 

"When Johnny Murray left, you were made president," said George. Dick smiled. 
"I wonder, I often wondered, why they made you vice-president," George laughed 
good naturedly. Diek went on. 

" The Senior Christmas Party was a great success. Janet Tooze, Connie Tedesco, 
and Jane Poison gave us entertainment between the acts, remember? We all got a 
great kick out of Santa Clans, alias Mr. Brown. The Victory Dance went over great, 
too." 

"The class play "Youth Takes Over" was given February 16 and March 2. Eddie 
Dalto and Polly Barnes took the leading parts. The Prom, on April 13, and the re- 
ception on Graduation Day were both great." 

"The kids were kind of sad to leave W. H. S. I was too. Those were about the hap- 
piest days of my life. We had a lot of fun. The Senior Outing was the last event of our 
lour years. We had a great time." 

Mr. Stein got up and stretched. 

"Well, Gouldo, old boy, those good old days are over now, but before we get back 
to the present and our work, I have a letter which I know will interest you. It's from 
our old pal, Carl Schuler, from the Trade School. Listen." 



Dear Dick, 

I was reminiscing on our old school days; so I thought I'd drop you a line. Some- 
times I get rather lonesome for the old gang. 

Remember how our spirits were boosted by all the new improvements the first 
year I was there. There was the welding and sheet metal school for defence trainees, 
whic h had three shifts each operating on eight hours a day. The Sheet-Metal School, 
however, was a night project. 

Also there was the Auto Repair Shop's new car lift and grease gun. 

One of the highlights of the year was the time when the Civilian Defence Com- 
mittee had a parade which ended at the Legion Field. The Sheet Metal N. D. T. 
Course took part in this parade and put on an exhibition of their work at the Legion 
Field. A lot could be learned from the sheet metal exhibit. 

When we entered school in September 1943, I remember Mr. Whipple commen- 
ted on the increased enrollment, which totaled 138. 



c^V, PAGE NINETEEN 




PAGE TWENTY ^ 



Iii the middle of the year we got an airplane motor and a few instruments for use 
in the aeronautics class. New machinery arrived for use in different shops through- 
out the Trade School, and films were purchased from the army First Service Com- 
mand. A new ventilating system was put into the Sheet Metal department lor arc 
welding. 

The Printing classes had a change in their routine the day they went to the Ginn 
and Company's in Cambridge and the Boston Lintoype Print. 

A basketball team was renewed by the pupils of the trade school. 

We started our last year by using the unoccupied Room 5 as a drawing room with 

new desks, chairs, and equipment. Another change was that we began having music 
again— something not done for three years. 

Mr. Whipple called an assembly, about the second week of school and told the 
new boys the rules of the Trade School and gave a talk on the sale of War Bonds 
and Stamps. Then he showed some interesting movies on "How to Tell Counter- 
feit Money" and "Baptism by Fire." 

The seniors had a series of football games with the underclassman, which of 
course, Dick, we seniors won. 

Yes, recalling past days is a lot of fun. It takes up the leisure time of a millionare. 
Please write, Dick, and remember me to Gould, if you happen to see him. 

As ever, 

Carl 

George sighed, "It does seem good to hear from old friends. Have you heard from 
either Carlton Bates or Earle Comeau, Carl's fellow officers at Trade School that 
year?" 

"Yes, I have, but we must get clown to business now. I'll tell you all about them 
after we finished this little matter of a vice-presidency here which you dropped in 
about." 



c-BV, PAGE TWENTY-ONE 




Any veseuiVAoonce to 
cUavactevs livind ov <Jea.d 
is puveiy coincide r»W\ 



PAGE TWENTY-TWO «\a^ 



Class Prophecy Committee 



CAROL CURTIS, Chan man 
ELEANOR ANDERSON 
ALFIO BONGARZONE 
AUDREY BOYLE 
PHYLLIS CAIN 
NORMA CHENEY 
JUNE deWILLOUGHBY 
CHARLES EYIRS 
JAMES FLYNN 
JEAN HUNTRESS 
DORIS JANELLE 
VIRGINIA KALAGHAN 
DALLAS KNIGHT 
BARBARA LEARY 
ELINOR MacDONALD 
PAUL MacKENZIE 
RUTH O'NEILL 
NICHOLAS PAPPAS 
DANA QUINNAM 
DORIS RESENDES 
RAYMOND SMITH 



PAGE TWENTY-FOUR <\a^ 



Class Prophecy 



One lonely night two seniors, longing for excitement, slipped into dungarees and 
old shirts, and stepped out into the blackness. Alter walking lor some time they 
found themselves standing before a dark and morbid house, rickety and seemingly 
uninhabited. Being young and unafraid, they hastened closer to view this night- 
marish spectacle. It was then that they saw a tiny slit of light shining from the 
interior. Pressing their faces up against the window pane, they saw, in a room light- 
ed only by the tiny flicker of a spluttering candle, two old women, holding on their 
knees a Hat board, and moving with their gnarled fingers something small near its 
surface. Straining in order to hear, the seniors discovered that the women were say- 
ing: "Ouija, Ouija, tell us tonight, what will these people do in future life? Come, 
Ouija, speak speak." 

And strangely enough as the piece moved it spelled these words: 



LOIS ABERDEEN— "Abby" will train at the 
Deaconess Hospital when she graduates from 
Weymouth High School. After a few year's work 
in the children's ward, she will become Superin- 
tendant of Nurses at the Hospital. 

ELEANOR ANDERSON— "El" will finally get her 
big chance in lite. She will direct an opera in New 
Yoik. Her musical experience will be attributed 
to her work in the Glee Club at Weymouth High. 

JOHN ANDERSON-John will be a cowboy star 
in the movies. He will also be touring the country 
with his own rodeo. 

SHIRLEY BABCOCK-'Rusty'' will be the new 
model for the Varga artists. She will pose for 
the month of August on the calendar of 1955. 

JANE BACON— Jane will be the private secre- 
tary of Dr. Drake, who will be the head surgeon 
at the Weymouth Hospital. 

WENDELL BAGLOW-'Wimpy" will be the 
baritone star of the Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany. 

RICHARD BAKISH— "Dick" will he sports editor 
of the "Weymouth Truth." 

JEAN BALMAYNE-Jean will become a well- 
known children's specialist. She will discover a 
cure for infantile paralysis. 

PHILIP BANDINI— "Phil" is now the star pit- 
cher of the Boston Red Sox. 



MARJORIE BARKER— "Margie" will be a social 
secretary to a famous playwright of M.G.M. 
Studios. She will later become known as a re- 
ceptionist for rising young starlets. 



PAULINE BARNES-After starring for four 
seasons in New York, "Polly" will open in Boston 
the tilth season of the year's best musical comedy. 

WARREN BARRETT-Warren, capitalizing on 
the knowledge he gained while taking the cabinet- 
making course, will be boss at a lumber mill. 

ALAN BATES— "Al" will be mayor of the city 
of Weymouth. 

CARLETON BATES-Carleton will be in busi- 
ness for himself making antique furniture, but 
will still borrow his father's tools. 

RICHARD BATES-'Dick" will be a famous ro- 
mantic movie actor, the current bobby sock rage. 

BETTYLEE BENJAMIN— "Betty" will be a sec- 
retary to a prominent criminal lawyer. After 
work she will teach piano lessons to many Wey- 
mouth youngsters. 

LILLIAN BLACKBURN— Lillian will become 
known as the model wife in the model household. 
This honor will be based on her own happv 
marriage. 

MURIEL BLANCHARD-Because she is partial 
to the Navy, Muriel will be a secretary at one of 
the local shipyards until she marries her favorite 
sailor. 

SHIRLEY BLANCHARD— Shirlev will work dili- 
gently until she receives her R.N. and then she 
will become a noted doctor, specializing in 
psychiatry. 

ROBERT BOND— "Bob" will be a sergeant in the 
Marines. He always hated civilian life, anywav. 



c-SV, PAGE TWENTY-FIVE 



ALFIO BONGARZONE— '"Al" will be known as 
"Doctor" when he finishes the tough schedule be- 
fore him. After he is released from the Navy, lie 
will go to California to set up practice. 

JEANETTE BOURQUE - Jeanette will have 
her own dancing school, and she will go into com- 
petition with Arthur Murray. 

PAUL BOWKER-Paul will he head draftsman 
for the Boston Edison Company. The ability that 
he exhibited along these lines while attending 
school will make itself evident. 

AUDREY BOYLE-'Aud" will go to college. She 
thinks that she will be a pediatrician when she 
graduates, but the Ouija board says that she will 
get married. The lucky fellow will be a former 
football star. 

KATHLEEN BOYLE— "Kay" will be modeling 
clothes for Sheridan stores all over the country. 
She will later become known as a clothes expert. 

FLORENCE BRADEEN-'Babe" will marry a 
certain Navy man and live a very happy post-war 
life. 

RALPH BRACCIA— Ralph will be the manager 
of the East Weymouth branch of the Stop and 
Shop. He will climb the hard way. 

BARBARA BRAGOLE— "Fran" will be grad- 
uated from an aeronautical engineering school 
and will acquire her pilot's license. 

RICHARD BRIGHAM— "Dick" is now serving 
in the Navy. He's just an old sea-dog now. 

MARILYN BRITTON— Marilyn will be still as 
lovely to look at as she was when at W. H. S. She's 
now a model, and still has one of those former 
Navy Ensigns on her arm. 

SARA BROOKS-'Sally" will work in the Han- 
cock Insurance Company until the war is over and 
she becomes the wife of a sailor. 

MIRIAM BROWN-Miriam will be the head 
nurse at Quincy Hospital for a few years. She will 
then marry for love. 

EUNICE BUCKLEY-Eunhc will be a prominent 
radio comedienne and singing star, noted for her 
jokes that excel any of Bob Hope's. 
Tune in every Friday nighl and hear her make the 
fellows swoon with her ow n ai rangement of "Give 
Me Some Men." 

FRANCIS 15UCKLEY - "Bucky" will be the 
featured trumpeter with the New York Phil- 
harmonic Ok best i a . 

JAMES BURKE, Jr.-"Bud" Iln 1 kt is now "beat- 
ing the skins" lor his own hand. 

MARIE BURKETT— Marie will be a Navy wile. 
W hile wailing lot hei husband to come home from 
sea. she will be the leading stenographer in a 
huge linn. 



ETHEL BURROW— Ethel will become a well- 
known figure in the business world. Her name will 
also become linked with that of a former graduate 
of Weymouth High School. 

JOHN BUTLER— "Bo" will be a secret agent lor 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He will lead 
an easy life and live in a comfortable home in 
Weymouth. 

FREDERICK BYERS— "Fred" will be president of 
a well-known publishing firm in New Yoik that 
publishes Latin "trots" with free translations to 
aid high school students in their translation of 
"Julius Caesar" and "Cicero". 

PHYLLIS CAIN— Phyllis will be married to a 

former Navy hero. 

PHYLLIS CALEN— "Phil" will have her wish 
come true as supervisor of nurses. 

MARIE CANTALUPO-Marie will own a stylish 
gown shop on Filth Avenue. Her charming per- 
sonality helps satisfy those "hard to please" 
women. 

GRACE CAR MICH A EL— "Grade" will under- 
take roller skating as her profession and will be 
successful as an instructor. 

THERESE CARRIERE— " I re", after a few year's 
sta) in France, will return to the States and settle 
down with a certain well, you know who. 

RUTH CARTER— "Carter" will be a pilot aboard 
a huge clipper ship. Her ship will make history. 

ROBERT CASEYJr— "Bob" will have a band of 
his own and will record many jazz tunes. 

ROBERT CAULFIlTD-'Red" will still be on 
the 8:15 shift; but instead of being a member of 
Mr. Lyon's elite stall, he will be the manager of 
a successful corporation. 

ELEANOR CHALKE— Eleanor will be a splendid 
w ile to one of those fellows in the Navy blue. She 
is carrying out all that which Miss Benson and 
Miss Escott taught her in W. H. S. 

LORRAINE CHAR RON— Lorraine will be a 
graduate of one of Boston's business colleges and 
secretary to an executive of a bank. 

NORMA CHENEY-Wc will be seeing stunning 
fashions and designs in the latest magazines and 
new spapers done by our own Norma. Wow! 

OLGA CHROIN AK-Olga is going to be a chem- 
ist, though she is now breaking half her equip- 
menl by giggling so much. 

SALVATORE CIANCIULLI-"Sal" now owns 
his ow n bai ber shop. He has a reputation from the 
good "clipping" that he gives all his customers. 



PAGE TWENTY-SIX «\&^ 



MARIE CIPULLO— Marie will be seen running 
a beauty shop of her own and giving the latest 
hair styles to all her former classmates. 

MARTHA CIPULLO— After many years of faith- 
ful service, Martha will be manager of her uncle's 
stole in South Weymouth. 

JOSEPH CLOHOSSEY— "Joe" is going to take 
OVd the White Brothers' stand in Hyannis and 
will live the "life of Riley" watching other people 
work and the girls come in the door. 

DONALD COFFEY— "Cueball" will still be in the 
Army. He will work himself up from the ranks. 

KARL COM EAU— Earl will give up the sheet 
metal trade when he has a chance to become 
head instructor at the roller skating rink in 
Neponset. 

GRACE CONNOR-"Gracie" will work in an 
office where she doesn't have to get up early or 
work hard, but still will have lots of fun. She will 
own her convertible coupe complete with a tele- 
vision set. At least that's what she wants. 

EVA CONRAD— Eva will be a graduate nurse and 
her patients will be doing remarkable well. 

DORICK CORBO-"Doc" Corbo will take over 
his father's grocery business, and will do a fine 
job. 

MARGUERITE CORBO-For "Peggy," with her 
captivating personality and college education, 
success will be assured. 

DONALD COTE— "Don" will be that versatile 
gentleman who will rise to glorious heights 
coaching college football and teaching wrestling to 
many eager patrons. 

RICHARD COTE- "Dick" will be a failure as a 
meter reader, but will emerge as a successful car- 
toonist for "Esquire." 

JOSEPH COVENEY-"Joe" will be a famous back- 
field ace of the Boston Yanks football team. His 
schoolboy training will serve him to great advan- 
tage. 

DOROTHY COWE-'Jersey" will be an instruc- 
tor in the International Business School after 
main \ears at White Brothers in Hyannis. 

HELEN CO WETT— Helen will make her boss 
\erv happy, because as a private secretary she is 
efficient as well as pretty. 

VIRGINIA CROSSMAN-'Ginny" will always be 
in the girl's gym as our physical education in- 
structor at W. H. S. Her exercises will be unique. 

DAVID CUFF-According to the Ouija board, 
David's days of p-ace and quiet are numbered. 
David, it seems, will be editor of the "New York 
Times." 



ROBER T CULLIVAN-"Bob" will continue to 
clown, but will be paid for it in Hollywood. He'll 
be Lou Costello's chief competitor. 

JOHN CULVER-Comm. "Archie" Culver U. S. 
C. (;., will be standing on the bridge of his row- 
boat as he bucks (he howling gales of Whitman's 
Pond. 

ROBERT CURLEY-'Tarkie" will probably lead 
the happiest life of any former Weymouth stu- 
dent. He will be a gentleman farmer owning a 
large country estate in South Hingham. 

LESTER CURRIER— Kindly address all of Les- 
ter's correspondence to Senator Currier, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

CAROL CURTIS-Carol will be that fine lab- 
oratory technician she has always hoped to be 
and will have as her boss a handsome young 
doctor. 

BETTY DAHLSTROM-Betty will win fame 
for her many complaints to the Lovell Bus com- 
pany for not having better service for high-school 
students in Weymouth Landing. 

EDWARD DALTO-' Eddie" will be a professor 
at M. I. T. No, Eddie, don't swear at them; 
remember when we went to school? 

MARY DALY— Mary will work hard as a sten- 
ographer until the right man comes along. There 
are rumors about the Navy now. How about it, 
Mary? 

JEANNE DAVIS— Jeanne, in a few years, will 
leave a good job and marry a veteran of the 
war. She and her husband will have a lovely 
home, furnished with tropical souvenirs. They 
will be parents of a curly-haired little girl, who 
will talk at the age of eight months. 

ARTHUR DELOREY-When you hear a swish 
and a zoom, you will know that it is "Art's Comet" 
streaking through the streets. He will be in the 
hearse-taxi business. 

JUNE de WILLOUGHBY-June will be starred 
in the new show, "Hats off to Ice," that will be 
playing at the Centre Theatre, Rockefeller Centre. 

ALBERT DIERSCH-".M"will be the owner of a 
prosperous florist shop, where all members of his 
old c lass may buy flowers at a special rale. 

JOHN DONOYAN- 'Father John" is now a pro- 
fessor of biology at Georgetown University. 

NEIL DUNCAN— Neil will be a staff sergeant in 
the United States Marine Corps. 

EUGENE DUNN-Eugene. at last, will be putting 
his brilliancy to work. Eugene will be a drafts- 
man for Stone and Webster. 

WILLIAM DUNN, JR.-William will be a pros- 
perous architect. His plans for the future will 
consists of a new 150-story office building in the 
heart of Boston. 



c^V, PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN 



JAMES DURANT— "Jimmy" will be a chiei 
petty officer in the United States Navy. 

VIRGINIA DURANT — "Ginna" will have an 
original, if not dangerous job. teaching new 
drivers the art of steering. As an example of 
caution she will show each pupil the various 
scarred trees in Weymouth. 

JOHN DWYER-'Bill" will be the proud owner 
and captain of a no foot fishing dragger sailing 
out of Plymouth. 

WILLIAM DWYER, JR.— ' Bill" Dwyer will be 
working as a high diver with the Ringling Bro- 
thers' Circus. 

AVIS ELLSTROM— "Sandy" will be the new 
successful creative artist of the Disney studios. 

MARTIN ENBERG, Jr.-"Marty" will be the 
proud owner of the Quincy Oil's "Super Service 
Station" in East Weymouth. 

DOROTHY ERICSON-When you go into the 
Granite Trust Company to deposit your wealth, 
you will see a cute little blond. Yes, it will be 
our old friend, "Dotty". 

CHARLES EVIRS-"Charlie" will achieve his 
foremost ambition of joining the Navy and be- 
coming an admiral. 

IN'GRID FALLGREN-After "Ingie" completes 
her course at the Hickox Secretarial School, she 
will become private secretary to one of Boston's 
most prominent lawyers. If she has a son. the 
scion will probably be prominent in her life, too. 

NATALIE FAUL— "Nat" will, in her pleasant and 
pleasing manner, be greeting those who come 10 
her exclusive summer resort. 

FRANCIS FERGUSON— "Fergie" will be the 
Chief Gunnery Officer in Uncle Sam's Navy. 

MARGARET FERULLO-Margaret will be keep- 
ing the home fires burning for her sailor husband, 
who will be expected home for good. 

JOHN FILLMORE - "Jack" Fillmore will be 
working for the Pontiac Corporation as a test 
driver, specializing in high speeds with his eyes 
shut. 

CONSTANCE FLATHERS - "Connie" will be 
happily married and settled down in a little white 
house with a white picket fence, keeping house 
and cooking according to the standards she was 
taught while a student in the Household Aits' 
( lasses at Weymouth High. 

SHERRARD FLEMING— "Sherry" will be head 
buyer for Crawford Hollidge. She will be the 
young lady who will bring exclusive and sensa- 
tional clothing to Boston's wealthy shoppers. 
With her winning personality she will make manv 
friends in New York, where she will go each week- 
end i<> shop. 



CHARLES FLETCHER— "Charlie", disregarding 
Mr. Stewart's prediction, will not wash dishes, 
but graduate from M. I. T., to become a well- 
known electrical engineer. 

JAMES FLYNN— "Jim" aftei stalling hom the 
bottom rung of the ladder in a newspaper office, 
will have his own stirring column. 

FLORENCE FORTIFR-'Floss" will be man 
aging the business affairs of her father's business, 
but will still be waiting for that certain man to 
come along. 

BARBARA FREEMAN— "Barb" will have real- 
i/ed her ambitions and be head physiotherapist 
at a large veterans' hospital. 

KA I'HRYN GANNON- "Betty will be head 
buyer in the Ladies' Department of Sheridan's. 
We'll know where to get our dresses, girls. 

DOLORES G A RO FA LO— Dolores will be Jack 
Benny's private hairdresser. 

PRISCILLA GAULEY— "Cilia" will be a famous 
Hollywood columnist. Her remarks are now on a 
par with Hedda Hopper's. 

RICHARD GI FFORD— Gi tford now owns his 
own wrestling arena. \t times he participates in 
I he ac tion, but says he gets tired climbing back in- 
to the ring after being "tossed" out so many times. 

FRANK GILCREAST-Frank will be a rising 
young construction engineer, who, nevertheless, 
will always be associated with the sports world. 

SUMNER GIVEN-Sumner will be an aviation 
pilot in the Navy. 

ROBERT GOODROW-' Goodv" will work in an 
airplane plant as a key man because of his size. 

DOROTHY GOODWIN-'Dot" will graduate 
from business school and then raise a group of 
dark haired boys. 

HAROLD GOODWIN-"Toughy" will own his 
own garage, complete with non-paying customers. 

WILLIAM GORMAN— "Mike" will be playing 
manager of the Weymouth All Stars, the best 
basketball team in the state. 

GEORGE GOULD— George will be graduated 
from college, and will be head foreman of the 
Draftman's Department at a large ship yard. 

DOROTHY GRASTORF - "Dot" will be the 
latest sensation in "cover girls." She will be pos- 
ing lor the cover of the "Mademoiselle" magazine. 

ESTHER GRILLO-Esther, after attending 
modelling school, will be seen quite frequently 
on the covcis of all the leading magazines. 

ANNA HALNAN— Anna will be modelling the 
latest luts at a large modelling store. 



PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT ^ 



DONALD HANIFAN— "Don" Hanifan will be 
working for the Weymouth Light and Powet as a 
Eoreman over meter readers. 

JEAN HARTFORD— Jean's name will In- found 
in "Who's Who" listed as a successful politician 
Who stood up lor the rights of women to have 
preference lor seats on public vehicles. 

\l \R1K HA WES— Where will the dress shies of 
'55 originate? Marie's Dress Shop is our answer. 

ALBERT HEALEY— At last "Al's" dreams of hav- 
ing a girl on his knee will come true. "Al" will he 
president of a large business concern. 

BARBARA HEARN— "Barb" will he the pro- 
prietor of a ch ug store. She will consider it a pretty 
good day when she can see the customers. 

CLAIRE HEAVER— "Charley" will begin her 
career as a private secretary. Alter several years of 
being a faithful worker she will be made a junior 
partner in the company. 

EDWIN HEISIG-"Ed's" always been up in the 
air about something and from his corners he will 
be still. "Ed" will be a pilot for the American Ait- 
Lines. 

KENNETH HEGER— "Kenny" will own his own 
reducing school; his motto will be "Look at me." 

RICHARD HERLIHY-You will see "Scat" at 
all the pro-golf tournaments taking home the 
trophies. Yes— sir— ee that man will be on the 
"ball." 

PRISCILLA HILLIARD-Priscilla will still be- 
aboard the Victory, scrubbing decks while sailing 
around the world. 

ROBERT HOAR— "Bob" will be a featured 
'daredevil" touring the country with his death de- 
fying feats. 

PAULINE HOLBROOK-'Tolly" will be heard 
daily on the radio, supplying the giggles called for 
in the script, and doing a bit of dialogue on the 
side. 

JOHN HOPEY— John will be a bus driver for 
Eastern Mass. He always said riding was faster 
than walking. 

RUTH HORSLEY— "Ruthie" will be Clark Ga- 
ble's private secretary. 

KENNETH HOWE-"Kenny" will be the largest 
poultry owner in New England. 

RICHARD HOWES- 'Dick" Howes will be an 
employee of the Waldorf Cafeteria. His chief 
duties will be to keep the customers happy. 



[EAN HUNTRESS— "Jeanie" will become a re 
habilitationist, alter she finishes Middlebury 
College. 

MICHAEL HYNES— "Mike" is playing shortstop 
for the New York Yankees. Keep your eye on those 
ground balls, "Mike." 

MARGARET INGHAM-Margarct will be a 
nurse at (he Weymouth Hospital. She wants to 
prove I01 herself that the way to a man's heart is 
not through his stomach. 

DORIS JANELLE-Doris will be holding hands 
with a lieutenant in an Army hospital, comforting 
him no doubt, as only an Army nurse can. 

JACQUELINE JORDAN— When "Jackie" fin- 
ishes w ith high honors at college, she will become 
a well known columnist. The Ouija board does 
not sa\ whether or not she will still be interested 
in people who collect buttons. 

HELEN JOSE— Helen's name will light Colum- 
bian Square every night until nine. She will work 
her way up from the soda fountain of Nash's Drug 
Stoie to the complete management of the place. 
Her name w ill be in neon above the door. 

JEAN JOSE— Jean's acting ability will be found 
shortly, for the Ouija board says that she will soon 
take Hollywood by storm. 

VIRGINIA KALAGHAN— "Gina" will be West- 
ern Union's speediest telegraphist. There will be 
a tall, blond gentlman in her life. 

BARBARA KELLEY— "Kel" w ill finally complete 
her nurse's training, and after recovery from her 
first grueling tonsilectomy, will become a stout- 
hearted nurse. She will be the most popular on 
the staff and brighten the patients' spirits with 
her blond hair and Ipana smile. 

NOREEN KELLEY— Noreen will be happily mar- 
ried to that sailor and will be keeping "the home 
fires burning." 

VIRGINIA KELLEY - "Ginnv" will be the 
Superintendent of Nurses at the Quincy Hospital. 

JOSEPH KEZER-"Joe" will be handling "the 
hot corner" for the New York Yankees. His name 
in the lineup has put a vast female audience in the 
stands. 

DALLAS KNIGHT-Dallas will be working as a 
soap tester at the Procter and Gamble factory. 

JEANNETTE KNIGHT-You will see Jeannette 
as the secretary of Governor Tobin. 

CHRISTINE KNOLL-'Chris" will be that at- 
tractive flight nurse, employed by a national air- 
line, who will send the pilots into a tailspin, but 
she will have eyes only for the Navy. 

c^3V, PAGE TWENTY-NINE 



EVERETT KOSARICK-To the list of the great 
masters of the past yon will be able to add the 
name of Kosarick. Yes. you guessed it; Everett will 
be thrilling thousands with his cello. 

DOROTHY KUNZ— "Dolly" will star in a spec- 
tacular new roller-skating show, "Follies of Fifty- 
five". After graduation, she will win contest after 
contest, and then originate revolutionary feats on 
wheels. 

GEORGE LABADIE— "Lab", who will abandon 
a potential career in football for a life in radio, 
will become a tremendous success. He will pro- 
voke more applause than any star; he's the man 
who holds the APPLAUSE sign. 

THEODORA LABRIOLA— "Theo" will have a 
rushing hair-dressing business in East Weymouth 
near Pete's shoe shop. 

CATHERINE LEAHY-Catherine will win the 
championship in shorthand. She will also have 
the important position as secretary to the Presi- 
dent. 

DONALD LEAHY— "Don" will be a home-loving 
family man. Of course there will be many new 
Leahys. 

BARBARA LEAHY— "Barb" will write spark- 
ling best sellers, but fame and money won't be 
able to win her affections. 

THOMAS LEAR Y— "Tom" will be a doctor for 
the First National Stores. That's right; he will be 
cutting up cows and chickens behind the meat 
counter. 

WILLIAM LEI NONEN— "Bill" will farm the 
wild and woolly hills of Maine. We know his 
intelligence will make him a success there. Did 
Mr. Stewart have anything to do with it, Bill? 

EDNA LEONARD— "Ed" will be soothing some 
patient's feverish brow while her thoughts are 
with a well-known roller skater from Nash's 
Corner. 

JOHN LENNOX-" Johnny" will drive for the 
Lovell Dependable Bus Lines. 

RICHARD LIVINGSTONE— "Red" will earn 
a living as an author. You've heard of "Gone 
Willi The Wind" haven't you? Well, he will 
write a sequel to this called "Back With The 
Breeze". 

DONALD LYNCH— "Don" Lynch will be a 
traveling salesman in the rural districts. His 
car will run well in the daytime, bin it will 
break down at night. 

ELINORE MacDONALD - Elinore MacDonald 
will own her own telephone company. The way 
she keeps the lines busy now, she needs her own 
company. 



CATHERINE MacKENZIE— "Kay" will be the 
leading model of the country. Her height will be 
one of her main advantages. 

PAUL MacKENZIE — Paul will be an English 
teacher at Cornell. As a sideline, he will be < oa< h- 
ing the leading politicians in the country in their 

speeches. 

WILLIAM M.\cKEN/.IE-"Mac" will be the star 
pitcher for the St. Louis Browns. 

RITA MACHONOCHIE— Rita will be seen mod- 
elling the latest style clothes at the "Paris" shop. 

WILLENA MacKAY— "Willie" will leave her pro- 
fession as a nurse to look after her own young- 
sters in her own quiet home. 

DORIS MAR FIN— Doris will be the leading sec- 
retary in a large him. Her quietness and efficiency 
will help her to maintain this position. 

LAWRENCE MARTIN— "Larry" will be the suc- 
cessful manager of the South Weymouth Bowling 
Centre. Quite a rise from his former job as 
pinboy! 

DOROTHY MASISON-' Dot" will be the first 
woman head of a defense plant. After several 
years of the exciting life of an executrix, she 
will settle down to the quiet life of a wife. 

VIRGINIA MATHEWSON-' Gina" will be sail- 
ing round the world in her yacht "The Nipper '. 
She'll have a man in every port. 

BERNICE MATTSON— "Bunny" Mattson will 
be Hollywood's brightest star. In her latest film 
we will see her surrounded, as usual, with hand- 
some men. 

ARTHUR McCAFFERTY-"Mac" will run his 
own sheet metal shop in South Weymouth. 

THOMAS MCCARTHY— "Tom" will be an in- 
spector for the government. That Marine training 
did him a lot of good. 

WILLIAM McCURDY - "Bill" McCurdy will 
still be chasing hies in his trusty Ford. Then he 
will be known as Chief McCurdy. 

DANIEL Mc FAR LA N D— "Dan" will be the star 
half-back with the Washington Red Skins. 

ANNE McGOVERN— Anne will be a graduate 
from Emmanuel arid will be a very successful 
model in New York City. 

ELIZABETH McINTOSH— "Betty", with her 
baby skin and lovable smile, will marry, and her 
sweet countenance will grace our leading maga- 
zines as one of the country's lovely-complexion 
brides. 



PAGE THIRTY ^ 



FLORENCE McLELLAN— "Flossie" will have 
her own "Kitchen- Vue" (amis store. She really 
won't have to work, because her husband will own 
a soap factory, but she will always be a busy 
person. 

LOIS McMENIMON— Lois will be head of the 
Guidance Department at Weymouth High. Aftei 
her many years of experience, she will help the 
students solve the problems of. why they're late 
lot school, what they have to sta\ after lor. and 
w in they sta\ away from school. 

RUTH McPHEE - Ruth's pleasing personality 
and initiative will bring her success. She will be a 
court stenographer for one of the nation's leading 
judges. 

ROBERT MEHRMAN— "Bob" will be the man- 
ager of his ow n shoe store in Boston. 

MARJORIE MICHAUD— "Marj'e" will teach 
dancing in New York aside from making tours 
w ith her partner. 

DOROTHY MIELBYE - Lorraine will serine 
a position as secretary to the manager of a large 
shampoo concern. Her pretty hair will shine in 
all her employer's advertisements and she will 
last become a popular model. 

WILLIAM MORGAN— "Bill" will become the 
manager of the A. & 1'. Super Market at East 
Braintree. 

ROBERT M UGFORD— "Bob" will be chief radio 
technician for station WBZ. His knowledge of 
this subject will make him one of the leaders in 
this field. 

RUSSELL MUGFORD - "Russ" will work as 
duel radio engineer with the N.B.C. network. 

JUNE MURLEY— "Tunie" will be a receptionist 
lor Blown, Field, and McCarthy, a famous law 
firm. She will interview all the rising, up and 
coming young lawyers. 

MARY N APOLITANO— Mary will be employed 
as a private secretary in Boston; and when the firm 
opens a branch in Framingham, she will be the 
first tcj apply for the position there, because of a 
purely business-like interest, of course. 

ROY NELSON-Rov, Nelson will be South Wey- 
mouth's leading contractor. He will no doubt, be 
the one to introduce South Weymouth to modern 
plumbing. 

ETHEL NICHOLAS— "Nicky" will be designing 
the wardrobes of New York's best dressed women. 

MARION NICK.ERSON— "Nickie" will decorate 
the office of a big executive as a private secretary, 
but she will eventually obtain a permanent 
position in the Navy Department. 



NICHOLAS NOCERA, JR.-"Nick" will have 
chosen the Navy as a career. 

LORRAINE NOLET-Lorraine will own a large 
department store in Boston. Aftei her man) veais 
i.i experience in this field. Lorraine will know 
what is expected of a big executive. 

SIDNEY O'LEARY— "Sid" will be working in a 
small sheet metal shop in East Weymouth. 

RITA O'NEIL— Rita will be seen once a year, 
accompanied by her tall, dark, n' sharp-looking 
husband, on a visit to the home folks from New 
York. 

RUTH O'NEILL— "Ruthie," alter graduating 
with honors from a journalistic school, will be 
writing and illustrating a book which is sure to be 
a success. 

NATALIE OTIS-"Natilie" will be travelling 
over to China on her first trip round the world. 

MARILYN PALLIS-Marilyn will be art editor 
of a widely read New York newpaper. 

WILLIAM PANORA-"Pip" Panora will own 
and fly a fleet of transport planes up in Canada. 

NICHOLAS PAPPAS-"Nick" will always be 

ready to give advice for a price. Nick will be 

one of the nation's prominent lawyers. 

YVONNE PETIPAS-Yvonne will be employed 
as a secretary, and with that cheerful disposition, 
working with her will be a pleasure. 

ROBERT PETZE-'Bob" will be displaying 
those service bars that he earned in the Air 
Corps. He w ill be sneaking on the road to success 
by advertising cigars, with his natural features 
helping hint out. 

RUTH PITTS— "Ruthie" will be married to a 
novelist and will help him in his work. 

IRENE PLOURDE-Irene will be working in an 
office, where her infectious smile and lovely hair- 
make it hard for the male employees to concen- 
trate. 

JANE POLSON— Jane's name, as leading lady of 
the season's best play, w ill be seen in the lights of 
a broadway theatre. Lots of success, Jane! 

BEVERLY PRATT— "Bev" will still be trying to 
decide whether it is this one or that one with 
whom she will settle down and live happily. 

JOSEPH PRATT-"Joe" will be the manager 
of the Farm Bureau. He will be able to satisfy the 
farmer's needs because of his agricultural train- 
ing. 

DANA OUINNAM, JR. -"Squint" will be the 
owner and operator of a local paper, "Weymouth 
Gossip". 

c^v, PAGE THIRTY-ONE 



JOANNE RALPH— Joanne will graduate from 
the Massachusetts General Hospital. Later on she 
will become superintendent of the school of nur- 
sing. 

OSWALD RALPH-"Ozzie" will take over his 
uncle's business in the greenhouse. It will be eas- 
ier than auto repair. 

GERTRUDE RENNIE— "Ren" will have married 
a handsome service man and will be living happily 
in a vine-covered cottage. 

DORIS RESENDES-Doris will be a member of 
the gay young married set, flashing about town 
in her maroon convertible with her admiring 
husband. 

SHIRLEY RICE— Shirley will be a secretary in 
a department store and own a small share in the 
business. 

WILLIAM ROBER— "Bill" will be a metallurgist, 
having his own private laboratory. 

STANLEY ROBERTSON-' Stan" w ill be wrest- 
ling professionally under the title of "Little 
Hercules". Some of the wrestling grips he learned 
in high school while on the wrestling team will 
be a great help. 

LEONARD RUSSO— "Lenny" will run the lino- 
type for Dana. 

BARBARA SAMPSON— "Barb" will be a grad- 
uate of Simmons, and will make her way in the 
field of advertising. 

FREDERIC SARGENT-'Fred" will hold an 
important position in radio. You've heard the 
fellow say, "When you hear the musical note it 
will be exactly three o'clock", haven't you? Well, 
Fred's the fellow who will actually hit that note. 

DOROTHY SCHROMM-'Dottie" will be a 
private secretary to a New York firm after com- 
pleting a course at Fisher's Secretarial School. 

CARL SCHULER— Carl will open a filling station 
in Weymouth. Many stations in that area will 
close up because of his "go-getting" abilities. 

ANNA SCOTT-"Scotty" will be a famous 
Power's Model and favorite pin-up girl of the 
younger set. 

WILLIAM SCRIBNER-"Bill '. alter attending 
college, will become a well known author and 
statesman. 

CARL SEPPALA-Carl will be voted the most 
handsome lieutenant of the Marine Corps in the 
Sont h Pa< ili< Area. 

LOIS SHAW— Lois will be co-owner of Sheridan's. 

PAGE THIRTY-TWO -v&^ 



CATHERINE SHEEHAN— "Ka\ ' will be editOI 
of a new book "New And Bettei Jokes Designed 
For Better Laughing." 

ALFRED SHEEHY"— "Al" will be a teacher and 
faculty manager of sports at Weymouth High. 

MARGARE I SHERWOOD— "Peggy" w ill be se- 
as a buyer of Boston's largest stores. 

ELEANOR SIMONDS-Eleanor will be the chief 
cook and bottle washer at the Hingham Cafeteria. 

CARRIE SI ROON I A N-"Ch icko" will be mar- 
ried, even though she says "No". 

LEON SIROONIAN-' Leo's" dream will finally 
come true, He will be the Marine Corps' "light- 
inist" general. 

FRANCIS SLATTERY— " Jabbei " will be one of 
the sharpist sports editors of the time. He will 
view all the games horn the press boxes, and his 
daily comments w ill be seen in the sports column 
of the Boston Post. 

DOROTHY SLOANE— "Dot" will be happily 

married to an ex-service man. 

CARRIE SMITH-Carrie will be seen hurrying 
back and forth to the new "Kitch-in-Vue"' store 
when she isn't bus) w ith her secretarial duties. 

JOHN SMITH, Jr.-Charlie will be Ray's ac- 
complice in the new garage. 

RAYMOND SMITH— "Ray" will be the proud 
owner of the specially built garage. 

MAZIE SPINELLA— Ma/ie will be doing clerical 
work at a large shipyard. 

JUNE STEELE— June will be making huge pro 
tits for a (hug store in S. Weymouth, if she is able 
to resist the sweet music of wedding bells. 

RICHARD STEIN— "Dick" will be one of the 
South Shore's well known veterinarians and will 
be making a huge success of his practice. 

VERNE STENBERG— Verne will be an excellent 
secretary, capable and industrious. She will be a 
good cook, too. 

ROSE-MARIE STOKES-Rose -Marie will be 
married to a wealthy man. They will make their 
residence in South Weymouth. 

EDITH STONE-Edith. with her excellent train- 
ing at Weymouth High, will secure a secretarial 
position with a large Boston firm. 

EDNA SULLIVAN— Edna will abandon her 
dream to become a successful career woman to 
many, settle down, and raise future students for 
her Alma Mater. 



EDWARD SULLIVAN Jr.-*'Eddie" will be a 
chief petty officer in the U. S. Navy. He will be 
married and have two children. Lots oi lu<k to 
yoiij "Ed." 

|OHN SULLIVAN— "Johnnie" will make dancing 
a business. He will open a school of Terpsichore 
w hose competition will worry A) thur Murray. 

DONALD SYLVIA— "Don" will be the leadei ol 
one of the nation's famous dance bands. 

CONSTANCE TEDESCO— After two years spent 
ai a finishing school, "Connie" will become one 
of the John Powers' famous models. She will ap- 
pear on the (overs of the most popular magazines. 

THOMAS THURSTON— "Tom", (he head of a 
family of six, will work for a big garage in Boston. 

[ANET TOOZE-Janet Tooze will be the 
country's foremost dancer, but she will still give 
those private lessons at home. 

BARBARA TO WLE— "Barb's" dream to become 
an engineer will come true. Barb will be seen in 
the cab of the Boston and Albany train leaving 
South Station every morning at 10:30. 

[ESSIE TR I'M BE LL— Jessie will attend secreta- 
rial sc hool in Boston. She will then become a very 
efficient and charming secretary. 

SHIRLEY VENTRE— When the war is over, 
"Shirl" will have a cute little home on Randall 
Avenue. 



LOR R AIM''. VOIG1 Eon. line will make the 
ends meet, considering the diffi< ulties encountered 
with the expense ol two children. 

MARJORIE WARD— "Marj" will inheril a large 
sum of money and live a life of luxui v and leisure. 

Mil. ION WATTS— "Milt", alter graduating 
from M. I. T., will become an engineci in an air- 
plane plant. 

IRENE WEISSLINGER— Irene, in her quiet, 
patient manner, will be instructing (he new nurses 
entering (he Massachusetts General Hospital. 

MABEL WHALEY-Np divorce case will have a 
chance alter Mabel becomes Honorable Judge 
Whaley. 

ANNA WHITE— Anna will marry her boss, but 
from her experience as secretary, will keep an 
eagle eye on the actions of her better half by 
making daily visits to his office. 

NORMAN WHITTLE-Norman, with his large 
frame, will be the football coach at Weymouth 
High. 

EARLE WILLIAMSON, Jr.-His training in the 
Air Corps will enable him to be chief pilot of the 
Transcontinental Airways. 

DOLORES WOLFERT-' Dee" will give some of 
Boston's best artists plenty of competition. Lots 
of luck, Dolores! 



c^V> PAGE THIRTY-THREE 



American Prisoners soy: 




WANT TO GET 



BACK AT 
THE JAPS/1 





MATCH THBRSFIIUT in tie MIGHTY 

7* WAR LOAN DRIVE 



YES, despite their long months and 
years of privation and suffering, 
those gallant men, just released from 
filthy Jap Prison Camps, still have 
their good old fighting spirit. They're 
itching to get back into the fight and 
give the Nips a taste of their own 
medicine. 

Let's show them that we're not 
quitting either! Let's match their 
spirit with our dollars! Let's make 
this MIGHTY 7th War Loan the 
mightiest of them all! 



But to come even close to matching 
their sacrifices, everyone here at 
home must buy War Bonds until it 
hurts. Buy double or treble the extra 
War Bonds you've bought in any 
previous drive. Remember, this is 
really two drives in one. In the same 
period last year, you were asked to 
subscribe to two War Loans. 

So let's go, Americans. Our hard- 
fighting Soldiers, Sailors and Ma- 
rines are giving their ALL. The least 
we can do is to lend our dollars. 



THE 

MIGHT" 




EVBmSQPV-BIJVMOREMdBimR WAR BONK 



HIGH HONOR ESSAY 



Ever American: 



Washington 

By JEAN CAROLYN HUNTRESS 



Three American leaders, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Franklin 
Delano Roosevelt, are deep in the hearts ol every American because they loved free- 
dom, fought and died for freedom. As we stand on the threshold ol the future, these 
three men are our companions in our new venture. Each, who was a lighter for free- 
dom, gained his victory when a war blackened the blue skies, exhausted both mind 
and body; and, in reality, caused the death of each. Washington fought in a revolu- 
tion; Lincoln exercised his supreme authority in a civil war; Roosevell supported a 
war for freedom of the world from the grasp of a fanatic. Each was a victor, in his 
own century, in overcoming the opposition of Congress and the prejudices of the 
people. 

Let us now consider the first of these heroes who was successful in leading the 
colonists ol America to the building ol our country, the powerful United States. 

Whittier once said of Washington: 
"His rule of justice, order, peace, 
Made possible the world's release; 
Taught prince and serf that power is but a trust, 
And rule alone, which serves the ruled, is just." 

Washington's early life, the same as the average youth of his clay, is well known 
by all; yet few realize that this beloved man ever had to bear a cross— a cross of 
hatred and opposition. In the annals of history, this different phase of his life in the 
service of his country, both as an accomplished leader of men on the battlefield and 
as a diligent President, is somewhat overlooked. 

At the outbreak of the Revolution, Washington took command of a ragged, ill- 
disciplined army. Although without ammunition, well-trained leaders, or a united 
country behind it, this skeleton army soon grew to love the humble leader. Despite 
hunger and cold, they executed his every command; however, the) had to retreat in 
many instances in seemingly hopeless deleat. His winter at Valley Forge is as fa- 
mous as Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo. In the darkest days, Washington chose as 
his battle cry, "Victory or Death!" Victory it was. 

Many times plots against the able general were uncovered. For instance, he was 
to be captured, poisoned, slabbed, and hanged until dead,— all at once. Espionage 

PAGE THIRTY'SIX ^ 




agents frequented his tamps to glean information from his starving, foot-sore infan- 
try. Congress continually blocked his e very move. Instead of aiding him to hold the 
army together, Congress facilitated desertions and reduced the term of enlistment. 
They unceasingly refused medical aid, food, ammunition, and even a meagre pay 
with the remark, " The men place too high a value upon mere leaving their homes 
and giving their lives." How could Washington win a war against an outside enemy 
when he had to light this cruel enemy within? Nevertheless, Washington, a man of 
diplomacy and prayer, was victorious over great odds. 

Now that the states had won their war lor independence under the leadership 
of the able general, were they to fall from the heights where Freedom had placed 
them to the oblique darkness of colonial dissension? The soldiers who had followed 
Washington, loving him faithfully, took it upon themselves to declare him a dicta- 
tor, their only solution to the baffling question, they believed. Washington read the 
letter from the army, shook his head sadly, answering with tears in his eyes, "It is 
with a mixture of surprise and astonishment I have read the sentiments you have 
submitted to my perusal." He continued expressing his regrets or their attitude. 
Concluding, he said slowly and evenly, "Let me conjure you, then as you have regard 
for your country, for yourself, or posterity, or respect for me, to banish these 
thoughts from your mind." He was bent by the weight of the tragedy which might 
befall his country and endanger the freedom he had fought so hard to win. A few 
days later he met with the officials of the army, when, by stirring the emotion of 
patriotism in the hearts of his followers, Washington averted the inevitable conflict 
between Congress and the army. 

As the Constitutional Convention gradually formed from the remaining mem- 
bers of the opposing fractions of a weak Congress, Washington was summoned once 
again by a country, greatly in need of an aggressive leader. Like the great statesman 
that he was, he consented, leaving behind his peaceful life at Mount Vernon to pre- 
side over the Convention, leading the lost sheep back to the fold of democracy. At 
the adjournment of the Convention, he retired once more to Mount Vernon to the 
life of a simple plantation owner; yet, Washington was not destined to pass into ob- 
scurity. He remains immortal as the first President of the United States. 

He had presided over a country fermenting with unrest. Washington accepted, 
in good faith, all the trials of the people; yet he was blamed if his solutions were not 
acceptable. Political and financial enemies opposed his tireless character, once call- 
ing him "the Stepfather of his Country." Congress refused his legislation; news- 
papers attacked and ridiculed Washington's efforts for unity and democracy. In re- 
gards to foreign affairs, Washington issued the famous Proclamation of Neutrality, 
warning his beloved country to refrain from "foreign entanglements." This, too, was 
unheeded. In spite of continual persecution, Washington submitted for the cross of 
hatred and opposition, a wreath of laurel. Victory had been won. 

We, as Americans, can never forget this humble man, lover of nature, friend of 
the soldier, and beloved president. Nor can the world forget what he has inscribed 
in the annals of time for others to follow. Washington was a man of dauntless cour- 
age and high intelligence; he possessed a soul overflowing with prayer and benevo- 
lence. 

Our world of today rushes forward, but returns on bended knee to pay tribute 
to this hero of yesterday, ever abiding in the minds of all Americans. 



c^V, PAGE THIRTY-SEVEN 



HIGH HONOR ESSAY 



Ever American: 
Lincoln 



By LORRAINE JEANNETTE VOIGT 



-A_s Washington welded his nation together at its conception, so Lincoln saved his 
nation at the time of its disunion. Because of his personal traits developed in adver- 
sity, Lincoln was a great leader to his nation through the great crisis of Civil War. 

The odds seemed to be against Lincoln from the time of his birth in the back- 
woods of Kentucky. He was, however, tenacious. Often, when a mere lad, he made 
political speeches to the boys in his neighborhood and later he talked to the trees 
when out chopping. Many of the obstalces encountered, he overcame. Even his total 
schooling of four months was opposed by his father. But for the perseverance of his 
stepmother, he undoubtedly would not have had this much. 

Lincoln was ever ambitious to comprehend throughly. He was frank and un- 
derstanding; such characteristics later made his success. He read and studied con- 
tinually until the time of his death. Every advance necessitated further and careful 
scrutiny for he wished to complement his deficiencies. 

Abraham Lincoln tried several occupations. He started in business, but his 
honesty and lack of capital soon concluded this venture. Then came a chance to be 
a surveyor. Lacking the mathematical background, he determined to overcome this 
handicap. Eventually he became a competent surveyor. 

Lincoln's poverty and background gave him an air of roughness; his awkward- 
ness and homeliness made him unacceptable to society. These traits made his path 
difficult when he entered finally the state legislature. He was practical and had a 
slow, ponderous way of handling problems which made him unpopular in public 
life. He always said, "Nothing valuable can be lost by taking time." Very early in his 
career, Lincoln began his opposition to slavery. He believed and so stated that "the 
institution of slavery was founded on both injustice and bad policy," but he could 
get only one man in the legislature to agree with him. 

He fought very hard to become a member of Congress and won, but lost the 
election two years later because of his opposition to the Mexican War. So he be- 
came a lawyer, which was also a difficult task, for he had to study hard to be able to 
match his famous, capable colleagues. Even then he was still a match for Stephen 
A. Douglas, preventing his election to the Presidency. 

PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT ^xa^ 




Abraham Lincoln, through personal adversity, had forged such characteristics 
of leadership that in the hour of his nation's crisis he could meet its needs. He was 
elected President of the United Stales. Before he had prepared his inaugural ad- 
dress. South Carolina seceded from the Union, and other states quickly followed. 
This Westerner with an intense devotion to the Union knew that he laced a divided 
nation. His life was constantly threatened, yet his ever-present sense of humor, his 
love of story telling, and his practical jokes relieved many times the tension under 
which he and his colleagues labored. 

A real ruler of men, he set out to do his work to the best of his ability. The seri- 
ous situation of the country, his opposition to slavery, and his seeming insignifi- 
cance in the nation made life difficult. His dexterity in leadership guided him in ex- 
ecuting his duties prudently. Induced to action by the men of the nation, he over- 
came his adversities and skillfully lead his country through its weighty conflict. 

Lincoln had been in office only a little more than five weeks when the Civil War 
began. One of his many problems shows the nobility of the man. He continually re- 
ceived requests from mothers and wives to save their deserting soldiers from being 
shot. He never ignored a call from his people; he even held open house so they could 
tell him their troubles personally; yet this kind and apparently popular man was 
continually threatened. 

All members of the American Congress, with the exception of one Represen- 
tative, opposed his renomination. When he did anything spectacular, people called 
him a "dictator;" otherwise, he was too slow and indecisive. When he followed the 
course of practical expediency, the opposition on both sides levied criticism. Con- 
stantly he was reminded that he was the leader of a minority. No matter what he 
did, lie came under the censure of editors. Attacked on all sides, Lincoln held true to 
Ins central idea of saving the Union. 

How did Lincoln become renominated and re-elected in view of so much oppo- 
sition? His knowledge of people, his kindness and his plain-spoken way convinced 
the simple farmers and Westerners to keep faith with him; while the others decided 
perhaps it was better not to "swap horses midstream." 

There was widespread talk against Lincoln's second administration, and move- 
ments to force him to withdraw were in progress in New York. Hie great human- 
itarian, however, carried on and saw the dawn of peace. Loo late people shouted his 
praise; for the heroic Lincoln, who had saved the Union, was assassinated while- 
attending the theater. 

Lincoln's speeches are perhaps the most quoted and long remembered because 
of their sincere, straightforward way of conveying his universal thoughts. Express- 
ing what was nearest the heart and mind of himself as well as of his people, his 
speeches had the clarity to be understood. As in his second inaugural address, Abra- 
ham Lincoln imparted the spirit of brotherly love and of prayer for an early and 
everlasting peace. 

"With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in right, as God 
gives us to see the right, let us strive to finish the work we are in; to bind up the na- 
t ion's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, 
and his orphan,— to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace 
among ourselves, and with all nations." 

CSV, PAGE THIRTY-NINE 



HIGH HONOR ESSAY 



Ever American: 



Roosevelt 



By MABEL ALICE WHALEV 



C3n the afternoon of April 12, 1945, the radio broadcast a news flash that electri- 
fied the world: "Franklin Delano Roosevelt is dead." What far-reaching effects this 
news carried with it! People throughtout the world were first dazed, then shocked, 
then saddened by it. People who had always opposed the man's policies felt the sig- 
nifigance of the loss. Kings and queens and statesmen expressed sorrow over his 
death. Nations lauded him as one of the world's greatest leaders. Even the Tokyo 
government was quoted as having conceded that Mr. Roosevelt was a great man. 

Why did the death of this one American have such a profound effect on the en- 
tire world? Perhaps the simplest way of answering this question is to say that our 
former President was a leader of leaders. He not only guided his own nation but 
even extended his influence to all the other freedom-loving nations of the world. 
Foreign government looked to him for aid and advice in carrying out the war as 
well as in planning the peace. 

What made this man such a great leader? It was not one quality, but a combina- 
tion of those same qualities, that earned for Washington and Lincoln the respect 
and love of their countrymen. 

Initiative was a quality young Roosevelt clearly displayed both in his attitude 
toward his companions and in his education. Although he was not a brilliant scholar, 
he managed to complete a six-year course at Groton in four years and a four 
year course at Harvard in three years, at the same time indulging in athletic and 
various other extra-curricular activities. Another example of this quality was his 
financial circumstances could have provided him. Even after he had become an in- 
valid, he carried on his law practice. Taking office as President in 1933 at a time of 
great economic and social distress, Mr. Roosevelt introduced the "New Deal'' to pro- 
vide employment, strengthen the failing banks, and improve the general financial 
condition of the country. Under this policy he obtained from Congress almost dicta- 
torial powers over agriculture, industry, and finance. Again in 1939 when Europe 
was plunged into World War II and most Americans were still looking to the Atlan- 
tic Ocean lor protection, he called for such defensive measures as the "Emergency- 
Arms Program" and the "Selective Service." The new President awaited the approv- 




PAGE FORTY <\a^ 



;il neither of his colleagues nor his public, bul with unwavering enthusiasm he 
launc heel (hose policies he considered best lor his Nation. 

In addition to his initiative, Franklin Roosevelt possessed unusual persever- 
ance. In 1920, running lor Vice-President with Cox, he suffered an overwhelming de- 
feat. Shortly afterwards fate dealt him another harsh blow in the form of the dread 
paralysis. Those c lose to him felt that the combination of the two blows would mean 
the end of his political career, but he soon proved them wrong by rising above his 
physical handicap to become governor ol New York in 1928. During his twelve- 
years as President, he continued to persevere. When two ol his favorite New Deal 
measures were declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court, he did not cease to 
introduce others of a similar nature. Although his Supreme Court Reorganization 
Bill met with opposition from the very beginning, he defended it until, after one 
hundred-eighty days of Congressional wrangling, it was finally defeated. The turn- 
ing of many colleagues from friend to enemy never succeeded in swerving him from 
his purpose. Nothing bul death was able to discourage him from his ultimate goal. 

Perhaps the one quality lor which Roosevelt was most noted and most criti- 
cized was his readiness to break precedents. This trait dates back to his career at 
Harvard where, as editor, he completely changed the nature of the undergraduate 
paper, The Crimson, by his frank treatment of untried subjects. In 1910, he, a 
Democrat ran lor the Senate from the traditionally Republican Duchess County and 
won the election. Upon entering the Presidency, he undertook many acts never be- 
fore attempted in the history of our government. His was the first banker's holiday. 
No one had ever before attempted to enlarge the Supreme Court above the tradi- 
tional nine members. In 1940, he broke a 152 year old unwritten law by becoming 
the first President to take office a third time and in 1944 he was even elected for a 
fourth term. Oi course the President was widely criticized for these incidents, but 
the criticism deterred him from his policies no more than did tradition. 

Through all his career Roosevelt continuously displayed courage. When 
stricken with a disease that has rendered many hopeless invalids, he became more de- 
termined than ever to lead a full life. Few of us realize that, when we saw pictures in 
which he walked, Iv merely shuffled a few steps supported by two canes without 
which he could not have moved. We seldom hear mentioned the heavy braces worn 
on his legs to support him when standing, although these discomforts have atten- 
ded the man through his twelve years as a public servant. In 1944 despite his failing 
health and the demanding responsibilities of guiding a nation at war, he accepted 
the office of President for the fourth time. All during the war he made long voyages 
through dangerous waters to represent his people in conferences of Allied Powers. 
On the sea, midst German submarines, he and Churchill decided the Four Freedoms. 
At Casablanca in 1943, they plotted "unconditional surrender" the only acceptable 
terms of surrender. The strain brought on by his last trip to Yalta where he contrib- 
uted to the plans of the San Francisco Peace Conference probably hastened his sud- 
den death. At no time, however, did fear for his personal welfare prompt Roosevelt 
to shirk his responsibilities. 

So, aided by these qualities, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, like Washington and 
Lincoln, has ranked himself among the lew immortal leaders of our nation and of 
the world. Like his two great predecessors, he accepted the responsibility of recon- 
structing a nation rocked by social, economic, and political upheaval. Like them, he 



<^\, PAGE FORTY-ONE 



too was called upon to guide his country through a "war Cor survival." Like them, 
he was forced to break precedents and bring upon himself the accusations of both 
friends and opponents. Like them, too, he was fully apprec iated only alter death. 

These three men were not only great leaders but also representatives of the 
American spirit. Without the sacrifices of such men, ours would not be the great na- 
tion it is today. At this time when our men are fighting and dying for the American 
ideals, may the spirit of these three great Presidents remain with us to guide us to a 
peace never again to be violated by power crazed radicals threatening world domin- 
ation. 



AUTOGRAPHS . . . 



PAGE FORTY-TWO ^ 



<^>eniot echo it 




LOIS ABERDEEN 

North Weymouth — College Course Abby 
Softball i; Volleyball i; Basketball ij Class History 
Committee 4, Spelling Bee Home Room Winner I, 
2, 3; Honors 1, 2, 3, 4. 

True to her word, her work, and her friends. 

ELEANOR ANDERSON 

South Weymouth — Business Course El 
Class Prophecy Committee 4; Mixed Glee Club 1, 2; 
Girls* Glee Club i, 2; Musical Revue 1; Secretary to 
Mr. Parker; Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certifi- 
cate for 60 and 80 words a minute 3; 120 words 4; 
Honors 1.4; Choir 4. 
4- 

Many come, many go, 

But few like her do any know. 

fOHN ANDERSON 

East Weymouth — General Course Andy 
Silence is golden 

SHIRLEY BABCOCK 

South Weymouth — General Course Rusty 
Library Assistants, 4; Choir 4; Graduation Clothing 
Committee 4. 

Pep, personality, and wit, 

Each of these exactly fit. 

JAM BACON 

South Weymouth — Business Course 
Class History Committee 4; Softball 1; Volleyball 1; 
Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certificate for 60 — 80 
words a minute 3; 100 and 120 words 4; Honors 1, 2, 
3; Secretary to Miss Stockwell 4. 

Meet her and you like her. 

WIN DELL BAG LOW 

Weymouth Landing — Business Course Wimpy 

Class Nominating Committee 4; Baseball 3, 4; Cap- 
tain of Baseball 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors 1, 2. 3, 4; Usher for 
Graduation 3. 

A toast to an all-round good fellow. 

RICHARD BAKISH 

East Weymouth — Business Course Mac Cye 

Home Room Messenger 2. 

IVhat lies beyond that quiet exterior? 

JEAN BALMAYNE 

Soutn Weymouth — General Course 

Red Cross Home Nursing Certificate 2 ; Home Room 
Messenger 1, 2; Lunch Room Duty 2, 3, 4. 
Nice to know. 

PHILLIP BANDINI 

North Weymouth — Business Course Phil 
Class Banquet Committee 4; Intramural Basketball 
1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Baseball 1,2; Varsity Baseball 

i, 2, 3, 4. 

Don't do today what can be done tomorrow. 

MARJORIE BARKER 

South Weymouth — Business Course Margie 
Home Room Messenger 1; Glee Club 1, 2; Musical 
Revue 1. 2. 4; Gregg Shorthand Transcription Cer- 
tificate for 60 words a minute 3: 80 and 100 words 4; 
Class Banquet Committee 4; Choir 4. 

Quiet at first, but look again. 

PAULINE BARNES 

South Weymouth — College Course Polly 
Junior Party Committee 3; Nominating Committee 4; 
Who's Who Committee 4; Glee Club 1, 2; Glee Club 
Secretary 2; Musical Revue 1; Senior Play 4; Honors 
1 ; Choir 4. 

In our midst wc have a singer and an actress. 

W ARREN BARRETT 

East Weymouth — Cabinet Making Warren 
Graduation Reception and Dance Committee 4. 
A good friend in many ways. 



PAGE FORTY-FOUR <\&^ 



ALAN BATES 

South Weymouth College Course .// 
Senior Prom Committee t; Baseball Choir 4. 
A (food worker, a good sport, and a good friend, 

CARLTON BATES 

North Weymouth Cabinet Making Batcsie 
Vocational Vice-President 4. 

Never put off until tomorrow what yon can do today 

RICHARD BATES 

Weymouth Heights —General Course Dick 
Wrestling 2, 3; (lice Club 1, 2, 3; Ticket Collector at 
all Sports 1, 2, 3; Photography Club 2; Junior Nom- 
inating Committee 3; Usher at Graduation 3; 
U.S.N. R. 

He has a nice manner and a winning way. 

BETTYLEE BENJAMIN 

East Weymouth — Business Course Bet 
Girls' Glee Club 1, 2; Usher at Senior Play 4. 
Short, sweet, and lovely. 

LILLIAN BLACKBURN 

South Weymouth — Business Course Lil 
Reflector Secretary 4; Who's Who Committee 4; 
Honors 1.4; Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certifi- 
cate for 60 words a minute 3; 100 and 120 words a 
minute 4. 

She's always bright and merry. 

MURIEL BLANCHARD 

North Weymouth — Business Course 
Csher at Senior Play 4. 

Variety is the spice of life. 

SHIRLEY BLANCHARD 

Weymouth Landing — General Course 
A true friend. 

ROBERT BOND 

Weymouth Landing General Course Bondy 
Home Room Messenger 4. 

Quiet — when someone's looking. 

ALFIO BONGARZONE 

Weymouth Landing — College Course Al Bungy 
Class Prophecy Committee 4; Basketball 2, 3. 4jln- 
tramural Basketball 1, 2, 3; Cheer Leader 3; Sports 
Editor, Reflector 4; Humor Editior, Weymouth 
Highlights 4; Laboratory Assistant 3, 4; Projectionist 
Club 4; Honors 1, 3; Regional Legion Oratorical 
Contest third prize 4. 

Personality is the first rung up the ladder of success. 

JEANNETTE BOURQUE 

South Weymouth -Business Course Tillic, Shortie 

Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certificate for 60 
words a minute 3; Secretary of Home Room 1. 
Sweet and talkative 

PAUL BOWKER 

Weymouth Landing — Sheet Metal Paul 

Christmas Party Committee 4, Class Banquet Com- 
mittee 4. 

He is full of great aims and bent on bold cmprizc. 
AUDREY BOYLE 

East Weymouth — College Course Aud 
Basketball 1; Volleyball 1; Softball 1; Honors 1, 2, 4; 
Class Nominating Committee 3; Class Outing Com- 
mittee 3; Reflector Staff 2, 3; French Club 4; As- 
sistant Student Council 4; Class Prophecy Committee 
4; Senior Play 4; Cheer Leader 4; Senior Party Com- 
mittee 4. 

She's here, she's there, she's everywhere. 




PAGE FORTY-FIVE 




KATHLEEN BOYLE 

North Weymouth -Business Course 

Quincy Junior High i; Glee Club ■; Freshman Play 

i ; Basketball 1 ; Social Cluh i ; Weymouth High 2, 

3, 4- 

She s not nmsy, loud or (jay. 

But enjoys life in a sweet, quiet way. 

RALPH BRACCIA 

East Weymouth — Sheet Metal Ralphie 

Never worry about anything; it doesn't pay. 

FLORENCE BRADEEN 

Weymouth Landing Business Course Babe 
Graduation Reception and Dance Committee 4; Girls' 
(ilee Club 2, 3; Home Room Messenger 4. 

Her friends she has many, 

Her foes has she any? 

BARBARA BRAGOLE 

East Weymouth — Business Course Fran 
Projectionist Club 4; Secretary to Mr. Lyond 4; 
Honors i, 2, 3. 4; Gregg Shorthand Transcription 
Certificate for 60 and 80 words a minute 3; 100 
words 4. 

To her will eome the finest things in life because to 

life she gives her best. 



RICHARD BRIGHAM 

North Weymouth — General Course 

He is a quiet fellow — sometimes. 



Dick 



MARILYN BRITTON 

South Weymouth — College Course 
Quincy High School i, 2, 3; Bowling Club 3; Writing 
Club 2; President of Red Cross 1; Horseback Riding 
Club 3;; Orchestra 1; Freshman Play 1; Weymouth 
High School 3, 4; Honors 3. 

Beauty is only one of her many charms. 



SARA BROOKS 

East Weymouth — Business Course Sally 
Happy am I ; from care I'm free. 

MIRIAM JiROWN 

Weymouth Landing — General Course Mim 
Ever ready as a friend. 



EUNICE BUCKLEY 

Weymouth Landing — College Course 
Fitchburg High School 1; Radio Broadcasting Cluh 
1; Weymouth High School 2, 3, 4; Choir 4; Secre- 
tary of Book Club 4; Class Will Committee 4. 

Loyalty is worth more than money. 

FR WCLS BUCKLEY 

Weymouth Landing — Business Course 
Graduation Clothing Committee 4. 

A fine trumpeter, a fine fellow. 

JAMES BURKE 

Weymouth Landing — Business Course 

Band 3. 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2. 

A little nonsense now and then is relished by the best 

of men. 



MARIE BURKETT 

Weymouth Landing — Business Course 
Class Will Committee 4; Gregg Shorthand Trans- 
cription Certificate for 60 and 80 words a minute 3 
100 and 120 words 4; High Honors 1,2; Honors 3, 4 
Homo Room Messenger 1 ; Home Room Treasurer 2 
Junior High Office 2, 3. 

Beauty, brains, and personality — combined! 



PAGE FORTY-SIX ^ 



ETHEL 111 RROW 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Class History Committee 4; Basketball 1; Secretary 

of Home-Room Club 1. ->; Home-Room messenger 2, 

3; Secretary to .Mr. Martin 3, 4; Gregg Sliorlhaiul 
Speed Certificates for 60 and 80 words a minute 3; 
1 00 and 120 words 4; Girls' Glee Club 2; Track 1; 
High Honors 1; Honors 2, 3, 4. 

Nothing succeeds like success. 

JOHN BU ITER 

Kast Weymouth — General Course Johnny, Ho 

Graduation Reception Committee 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 
4; Track 1; Wrestling 2; Intramural Basketball 2. 
He that huth knowledge spareth his words. 

FREDERICK BYERS 

Weymouth —College Course Fred 
Who's Who Committee 4; Projection Club 4. 
Knowledge is more equivalent to force. 

PHYLLIS CAIN 

Weymouth — College Course Phyl 
Class Prophecy Committee 4; Book Club 4. 

Good nature is a charming virtue. 

PHYLLIS CALEN 

South Weymouth- -College Course Phyl 
Hand 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 4; Musical Revue 1; Senior 
Play 4; Class Motto Committee 4; Honors 1. 
Unlike the common crowd. 

M ARIE CANTALUPO 

East Weymouth — Business Course Mac, Re 

Press Club 1 ; Chess Club 1 ; Reflector Staff 1 ; Basket- 
ball 1,2, 3; Volleyball 1, 2, 3; Softball 1, 2, 3; Girls' 
(ilee Club 1,2; Mixed Glee Club 2, 3; Musical Revue 
3; Choir 4; Public Speaking and Debating 4; Wey- 
mouth Highlights 4; Souvenir Salesgirl at Thanks- 
giving game 4 ; Legion Oratorical Contest 4. 

Anything but a quiet life for me. 

(.RACK CARMICHAEL 

Weymouth — Business Course Misty 
Basketball 1; Glee Club 2, 3; Choir 4; Class History 
Committee 4; Press Club 1. 

Laugh your way through life. 

THERESEA CARRIERE 

Weymouth Heights — Business Course Terry, Carrie 
Basketball 1; Track 1; Softball 3; Girls' Glee Club I, 
3; Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certificates for 60 
and 80 words per minute 3; Reflector Secretary 4; 
Who's Who Committee 4; Usher at Football games 4; 
Attendance Slips 4. 

A quiet unassuming girl who will go far. 

ROBERT CASEY 

Weymouth — College Course Dob 
Band 1. 2, 3. 4; Orchestra 3, 4; Model Manglers 2; 
Class Motto Committee 4. 

A good disposition is a great gift. 

ROBERT CAULFIELD 

Weymouth — Business Course Red 
Banquet Committee 4; Basketball Manager 2, 3, 4; 
Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Easy come, easy go. 

ELEANOR CHALKE 

East \\ r eymouth — General Course Eli 
Spelling Bee Champion 3. 4. 

A jolly good pal is long remembered. 

LORRAINE CHARRON 

North Weymouth — Business Course 
Attendance Slips 4. 

Personality is the first rung on the ladder of success. 




<-^V PAGE FORTY'SEVEN 




NORMA CHENEY 

North Weymouth — College Course Norm 
Glee Club i; Musical Revue i; Junior Nominating 
Committee 3; Student Council Assistant 4; Senior 
Play 4; Reflector Advertising Staff 4; Class Prophecy 
Committee 4. 
It's nice to be natural when you're naturally nice. 



} ; 1 Ionic Room 
; Volleyball I. 



OLGA CHRONIAK 

East Weymouth — College Course 
Class Will Committee 4; Honors 1 
Messenger 2; Basketball 1; Softb; 
French Club 4; Junior Party Committee 3; Student 
Council Assistant 4; Honors 1, 2, 3. 4. 

Talented in charm, charmingly talented. 



SALVA I ORE CIANCIULLI 

East Weymouth — General Course Sal, Salvy 

Wrestling 1 ; Graduation Clothing Committee 4. 
He is a quiet youth — at times. 

MARIE CIPULLO 

East Weymouth — Business Course Skipper 
Graduation Reception Committee 4; Glee Club I. 
Haste makes waste. 



MARTHA CIPULLO 

East Weymouth — Business Course 

Glee Club 1; Basketball 1; Weymouth Highlights 

Staff 4; Graduation Clothing Committee 4. 

Martha has achieved the art of sneezing. 



JOSEPH CLOHOSSEY 

South Weymouth — Business Course 
Reflector Business Manager 4. 

School doesn't worry him. 



Joe 



DONALD COFFEY 

Weymouth — College Course Cueball 
Banquet Dance Committee; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Cap- 
tain 4; Junior Nominating Committee 3; Intramur- 
al Basketball 1, 2; Honors 1. 

He is always quiet — / wonder. 



EARL COMEAU 

South Weymouth — Sheet Metal 

Vocational School Secretary-Treasurer 4. 

Education makes the man. 



Beaky 



GRACE CONNOR 

East Weymouth — College Course Grade 
Home Room Spelling Bee 1 ; Home Room Messenger 
4; Student Council Assistant 4; Graduation Re- 
ception Committee 4; Honors 1. 

She is the definition of a good sport. 



EVA CONRAD 

East Weymouth — General Course 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Musical Revue 3. 

Good things come in small packages. 



Eve 



DORICK CORBO 

East Weymouth — College Course Doc 
Class Motto Committee 4; Basketball 1, 2, ,3 4; Hon- 
ors 1, 2. 

Never trouble trouble until trouble troubles you. 

MARGUERITE CORBO 

East Weymouth — College Course Peggy 
Cheer Leader 2, 3, 4. Head Cheer Leader 4; Lunch 
Room Duty 2. 3; Junior Nominating Committee 3; 
French Club 4, Vice-president 4; Senior Prom Com- 
mittee 4; Senior Play 4; Honors 1, 2, 3, 4. 

One in a million. 



PAGE FORTY-EIGHT «\a^> 



DONALD COTE 

Weymouth College Course Don 
Football i, 2, 3, 4; Junior Party Committee 3; Grad- 
uation I 'slier 3; Chairman Senior Prom Committee 4; 
Oscar Horton Trophy 4; Senior i'lay 4; Honors I. 
Docs he worry t 

RICHARD COTE 

Weymouth College Course Dick 
Junior Decorating Committee 3; Banquet Committee 
4; Reflector Staff 1, 2, 3, 4. 

// silence is golden, Hick will never be rich. 

fOSEPH COVENEY 

South Weymouth Business Course Joe 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3, 4; Track 1, 2; Grad- 
uation I'sher 3; Student Council 3. 

A (treat football player whom we will always re- 
member. 

DOROTHY COWE 

South Weymouth — Business Course Jersey 
Quincy High 1, 2; Tennis 1; Archery 1; First Aid 
Club 2. 

A companion makes yood company. 

HELEN COWETT 

Weymouth — Business Course Honey 
Class Treasurer 3, 4; Cheer Leader 2, 3, 4; Basket- 
ball 1 ; Volley Ball 1; Reflector Staff 4; Gregg Short- 
hand Certificate for 60 words 3; for 80 and 100 words 
and 120 words 4; Honors 1, 2, 4. 

Clouded by no unfriendliness. 

VIRGINIA CROSSMAN 

North Weymouth — General Course Cinny, Crossic 
Home Room Messenger 1; Student Council Assist- 
tant 4. 

Wc have a roller-skater in our midst. 

DAVID CI FF 

North Weymouth — College Course Dave 
Class History Committee 4; Honors 1, 2, 3, 4. 
He is the quiet kind whose nature never varies. 

ROBERT CULLIVAN 

East Weymouth — Sheet Metal Bob Bump 

Basketball 2, Class History Committee 4. 

Wit and wisdom arc born with a man. 

JOHN CULVER 

South Weymouth— College Course Archie 
Senior Prom Committee 4; Basketball 2, 3; Track 3; 
Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3; Intramural Baseball 1. 
A friend to everyone. 

ROBERT CURLEY 

South Hingham — College Course Bob 
Everyone speaks well of him. 



LESTER CURRIER 

South Weymouth — College Course 
Legion Oratorical Contest 4. 

He'll find a way. 

C VROL CURTIS 

Weymouth Heights College Course Amy 
Reflector Staff 1,2; Maroon and Gold 2, 3; First 
Aid 2; Student Council 3, 4; Secretary 4; French 
Club 4; Victory Dance Committee 4; Senior Nomi- 
nating Committee 4; Class Prophecy Committee. 
Chairman 4; Senior Play 4; High Honors 1, Honors 
2. 3. 4- 

The answer to any fellow's prayers. 



! 

V f 

P -jH 








Tr 
















0$ J 





c^V, PAGE FORTY-NINE 




BETTY DAHLSTROM 

Weymouth — Business Course Lizzie 
Glee Club I, 2; Basketball 1. 

Serene and ealm. 

Amid the troubled day. 

EDWARD DALTO 

East Weymouth— Technical Course Eddie, Ed 

Glee Cluh t; Football I, 2, 3, 4; Class Will Committee 
chairman 4; Senior Play 4; Track 2, 3; Honors I, ZJ 
High Honors 3, 4; Graduation I'sher 3; Winner of 
Legion Oratorical Contest 

No grass grows under his feet 

MARY DALY 

East Weymouth — Business Course Irish, Flora 

Girls' Glee Cluh 1; Home Room Messenger 3; Class 
Will Committee 4; Attendance Slips 4. 

Watch out for those big blue eyes. 

JEANNE DAVIS 

South Weymouth — Business Course 
Senior Play 4; Reflector Advertising Staff t; 
Reflector Literary Staff 4; Proof Reader 3; Senior 
Prom Committee 4; Home Room Spelling Bee Cham- 
pion 1; Junior Party Committee 3; Christmas Party 
Committee ^-.Weymouth Highlights Staff 4; Gregg 
Shorthand Certificates for 60 and 80 words 3; 100 
and 120 woras 4; Honors 1. 3. 4; High Honors 2. 

Deeper, deeper, let us toil 

In the mines of knowledge. 

ARTHUR DELOREY 

Weymouth — College Course Arturo 
Nominating Committee 4; Class Banquet Committee 
4; Intramural Basketball 3, 4; Football 2; Baseball 
3; Honors i. 

/ awoke one morning and found myself famous. 

BARBARA DENSMORE 

East Weymouth- -Business Course Barb 
Class Will Committee 4; (iirls' Glee Club 2; Secre- 
tary to Mr. Martin 3; Secretary to Mr. Lyond 4; 
Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certificates for 60 
and 80 words 3; 100 words 4; Honors r. 4; Business 
Manager Reflector 4. 

Gay, good nature sparkles in her eyes. 

J UN E DeWILLOUGHBY 

South Weymouth — Business Course 
Senior Play 4; Reflector Staff 2, 3, 4; Senior Prophe- 
cy Committee 4 ; Basketball 1 , 2 ; Volleyball 1 , 2 ; 
Baseball 1, 2; Track 1; Secretary 4; Gregg Shorthand 
Transcription Certificates for 60 words a minute 3 ; 
80 and 100 words 4; High Honors 1, Honors 2, 3, 4. 
Her quiet dignity and simple way 
li'in her admiration every day. 

ALBERT DIERSCH 

East Weymouth— Agricultural Course A I 

Senior Nominating Committee 4; Spelling Bee 
Champion 2 ; Vegetable Judging Team 1 ; Poultry 
Judging Team 2; Flower Judging Team 3; Cattle 
Judging Team 4; Honors 2. 

Calm is he who knows his way. 

JOHN DONOVAN 

East Weymouth— College Course Father John 

Class History Comittee 4; Track 2, 3, 4; Projectionist 
Club 4; Hon rs 1,2. 3, 4. 

Write me as one who loves his fellow men. 

Mill. DUNCAN 

Senior Prom 4. 

South Weymouth- -Cabinet Making Dunk 
A good companion makes good company. 



EUGENE DUN N 

South Weymouth — C jllege Course 
High Honors 1, Horn is 2, 3. 4. 

His silence far outdoes the spec 



Gene 



'h of others. 



WILLIAM DUNN 

Weymouth— College Course Bill 
St. Petersburg Senior High School, Florida 2, 3; 
Chemistry Club 2. 3. Weymouth High School, Massa- 
chusetts. 1. 4.; Class Will Committee 4; Honors 2,3. 
.■/// things come to him who will but wait. 



PAGE FIFTY 



JAMES 1)1 RAN I 

North Weymouth Sheet Metal Jim 
Class Will Committee 4. 

The greater man, the greater courtesy. 

VIRGINIA DURANT 

South Weymouth College Course Gina 
Glee Club i; Assistant Student Council i; Banquet 
Committee 4. 
It's nice to be natural when you arc naturally nut'. 

WILLIAM DWYER 

North Weypmouth Sheet Metal Bill 
C.ristmas Party Committee 4. 

Youth is wholly experimental . 

WILLIAM DWYER 

East Weymouth — General Course Bill 
Study should never interfere with one's education. 

AVIS ELLSTROM 

East Weymouth — Business Course Sandy 
Junior Decorating Committee 3; Class Will Com- 
mittee 4; Girls' Glee Club I, 2; Mixed Glee Club 2; 
Reflector Staff 2, 3, 4; Weymouth Highlights, As- 
sistant Editor 3; Editor-in-Chief 4; Junior Red Cross 
Home Room Representative 1 ; Home Room Assistant 
Messenger i; Office Practice Supply Girl 4; Usher at 
Senior Play 4. 

All nature is but art. 

MARTIN ENGBERG 

East Weymouth Auto Repair Marty 
If knowledge were qold, he would be rich. 

DOROTHY ERICSON 

East Weymouth — Business Course Dotty 
Mixed Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Musical Revue 1; Gregg 
Theory Certificates 60 and 80 words a minute 3; 100 
and 120 words 4; Weymouth Highlights 4; Banquet 
Committee 4; Musical Revue 3. 

For every why, she had a wherefore. 

EDWARD EVIRS 

North Weymouth Sheet Metal Eddie 
Class Prophecy Committee 4. 

Never put off tomorrow what you can do today 
because tomorrow you won't have to do it at all. 

INGRID FALLGREN 

East Weymouth -College Course Ingie 
Class History Committee 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Honors 1. 2. 3. 4. 

Wearing all that weight of learning like a flower. 

NATALIE FALL 

East Weymouth Business Course Nat 
Home Room Messenger 2; Class Will Committee 4; 
Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certificate, 60 and 80 
words 3; [00 and 120 words 4; Secretary to Miss 
Nye 4; Honors 3. 4. 

Openly quiet but often fouls us. 

FRANCIS FERGUSON 

Weymouth Landing Auto Repair Fergie 
Who's Who Committee 4. 

Laugh and the world laughs with you. 

MARGARET FERULLO 

South Weymouth— College Course Margie 
Glee Club 2. 3; Weymouth Highlights 4. 

Of all the things I like best. 

I much prefer to sit and rest. 







■. 


ft 

X 






fr 






> 



c^v, PAGE FIFTY-ONE 



JOHN FILLMORK 

South Weymouth — General Course 
A rare combination — artist and mechanic. 



Jack 



CONSTANCE FLATHERS 

South Weymouth — Home Economics B Course 

Connie 

Softball 3 ; Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 
words 3; Miss Benson's Messenger 2; Junior Red 
Cross Certificate 2; Cafeteria duty 2. 

What sweet delight a quiet life affords. 

SHERRARD FLEMING 

South Weymouth — College Course Sherry 
Weymouth Highlights Assistant Editor 4; Senior 
Prom Committee 4, Student Council 2, 3, 4; Mixed 
Glee Club 1; Girls' Glee Club; Musical Revue 1; 
Band 1; Choir 4; Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 
2, 3; Class Spelling Champion 2; Senior Play 4; 
Honors I. 

Above the cloud with its shadoiv is the star with its 
light. 

CHARLES FLETCHER 

Weymouth — College Course Charlie 
Stetson High School, Randolph:; High Honors 1; 
Natick High School, Natick 2; Honors 2. 4; Wey- 
mouth High School 4; Christmas Party 4. 

From a little spark may burst a mighty flame. 

JAMES FLYNN 

South Weymouth — Business Course Jim 
Class Prophecy Committee 4; Graduation Reception 
Committee 4; Honors 1, 4. 

Slow and steady wins the race. 

FLORENCE FORTIER 

East Weymouth — Business Course Flossie 
Senior Clothing Committee 4; Weymouth Highlights 
Staff 4; Drum majorette 4; Usher Senior Play 4; Glee 
Club 2; Volley ball 1. 

/ could say something, I believe I will. 

15ARBARA FREEMAN 

South Weymouth — College Course Barb 
French Club 4; Who's Who Committee 4; Usher at 
Senior Play 4; Honors 1, 2, 3, 4. 

The only way to have a friend is to be one. 

KATHRVN GANNON 

East Weymouth — College Course Betty 
Home Room Messenger 1; Reflector Staff 2; Assistant 
Student Council 2, 4; Junior Party Committee 3; Sen- 
ior Prom Committee 4. 

Small and neat, winsome and sweet. 

DOLORES GAROFALO 

East Weymouth — College Course Del, De 

Christmas Party Committee 4; Weymouth Highlights 
Staff 4; Cafeteria Duty 2; Candy Girl at Football 

Games 2. 

A little nonsense docs no harm. 

l'RISCILLA GAULEY 

South Weymouth — Home Economics B Course Cilia 
Junior Red Cross Certificate *; Candy Girl at Football 
Games 2; Miss Benson's Messenger 2; Home Room 
Messenger 3; Reflector Staff 3, 4; Gregg Transcrip- 
tion Certificates, 60 and 80 words a minute 3; 100 
and 120 words 4; Assistant Manual Arts Instructor 
3; Weymouth Highlights 4; Who's Who Committee 
4; Honors 1, 2. 

/ have nothing dismal to remember. 

RICHARD GIFFORD 

Weymouth — -General Course Guff, Giff 

Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Senior Play 4; 
Graduation Clotbing Committee 4. 

A man after his own heart. 

FRANK GILCREASI 

South Weymouth — General Course Gill 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Wrestling 3, 4; Banquet Committee 
4- 

His thoughts are his own. 



SUMNER GIVEN 

North Weymouth General Course Peanuts 
Band 4; Orchestra 4; Cross Country 2. 

The best are often silent. 

ROBERT GOODROW 

South Weymouth Sheet Metal Bob 
A true friend is worth having. 

DOROTHY GOODWIN 

East Weymouth — College Course Dot 
Graduation Reception Committee 4: Press Club 1; 
Reflector Staff 2; Weymouth Highlights Staff 4; 
Senior Play 4; Honors 2. 3. 

A bright hello at noonday, a cheery smile at night. 

HAROLD GOODWIN 

Weymouth Landing — Auto Repair Toughy 
I dare to be different. 



WILLIAM GORMAN 

Weymouth — General Course Mike 
Junior Party Committee 3; Senior Party Committee 
4; Basketball i, 2, 3. 4. 

For many times I have been half in love. 

GEORGE GOULD 

East Weymouth — Technical Course Goulie 
Track r, 2, 3.4; Captain 4; Football 1, 2. 3, 4; Usher 
at Graduation 3; Nominating Committee 3, 4; Junior 
Rotary Club 4. 

The man that blushes is not quite a brute. 



DOROTHY GRASTORF 

East Weymouth — Business Course Dottie 
Banquet Committee 4; Home Room Messenger 2; 
Usher at Football Games 4; Basketball 1; Honors 3. 
Her personality and her appearance are equally at- 
tractive. 

ESTHER GRILLO 

South Weymouth — Business Course Ess 
Variety is the spice of life. 

ANNA HALNAN 

East Weymouth- -Business Course Red 
Girls' Basketball 1, 2; Volleyball 1, 2; Softball 1, 2, 
3; Graduation Clothing Committee 3; Honors 1, 2. 
A touch of humor is a saving grace. 

DONALD HA NT I AN 

East Weymouth — General Course Dag 
Intramural Basketball 1; Wrestling r, 2; Lunch 
Room Duty 1, 2, 3, 4; Banquet Committee 4. 

Happy am I, from care I am ficc. 

JEAN HARTFORD 

Weymouth — College Course Jcannic 
Home Room Messenger 3; Weymouth Highlights 
Staff 4; Class Motto Committee 4; Honors 1. 
Silence is golden but who wants to be rich? 

MARIE HA WES 

North Weymouth — Home Economics B Course 
Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certificates for 60 
and So words per minute 3; for 100 words 4. 

With quips and jokes, in her merry way, 
She keeps us laughing the livelong da-- 

t 




PAGE FIFTY-THREE 




ALBERT] HEALEY 

East Weymouth — College Course Chub 
Football i; Manager 2, 3; Wrestling 2. 3; Home 
Room Spelling Bee Champion 1. 2, 3; Nominating 
Committee 3; Graduation Reception and Dance Com- 
mittee 4 ; Honors 1 . 

Unlike the common crowd. 

BARBARA HEARN 

North Weymouth— Business Course Barb 
Student Council 3. 4: Musical Revue 3; Majorette 3; 
4; Nominating Committee 4; Gregg Shorthand Cer- 
tificates for 60 words 3; 80, 100 and 120 words 4. 
One glance she gives, and only one. 
But with that glance, the work is done. 

CLAIRE HEAVER 

East Weymouth — Business Course Charlie 
Gregg Transcription Certificates for 60 and 80 words 
per minute 3; 100 and 120 words 4; Red Cross Com- 
mittee 1; Banquet Committee 4; I'sher at Football 
Games 4; Secretary to Mr. Gutterson 4; Reflector Ad- 
vertising Staff 4; Weymouth Highlights typist 4; 
Honors 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Lovely to look at, lovely to knozv. 

KENNETH HEGER 

East Weymouth — Sheet Metal Ken 
Football 1. 2. 4; Wrestling 2, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 4; 
Track 1; Class Nominating Committee 4; Who's 
Who Committee 4; Weymouth Highlights 2, 4; 
Maroon and Gold 2. 4; Snoops4. 

The grestest pleasure in life is doing what 

people say you cannot do. 

EDWIN HEISIG 

South Weymouth- College Course E.I. 
Seniorl'rom Committee 4. 

"I'm just the one who can do it." 

RICHARD HERLIHY 

East Weymouth — General Course Skat 
Nominating Committee 4; Intramural Basketball 1, 
2 y Wrestling 4; Football 4. 

All tounges speak well of him. 

PRISCILLA HILLIARD 

North Weymouth— Business Course Cilia 
Softball 1. 2, 3; Student Council 2, 3, 4; Junior 
Party Committee 3; Class Secretary 3, 4; D. A. R. 
Representative 4; Gregg Shorthand Transcription 
Certificates for 60 and 80 words per minute 3; 100 
and 120 words 4. Honors 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Who can know her and resist her charm? 

ROBERT HOAR 

North Weymouth— Sheet Metal Bob 
Class Clothing Committee 4. 

A little nonsense now and then is relished by 

the best of men. 

PAULINE HOLBROOK 

South Weymouth Business Course Pauly 
Glee Club 1; Musical Revue 1; Senior Play 4; Gregg 
Shorthand Transcription Certificates for 60 words 
per minute 3; 80 words 4; Class Motto Committee 4. 
Laughing eyes and a merry smile. 

JOHN HOPEY 

North Weymouth — -General Course Jack 
Crosscountry Track 3; Winter Track 3; Baseball 3. 
He worries not, he hurries not, his calm is undis- 
turbed. 

RUTH HORSLEY 

East Weymouth — Business Course Ruthie 
Nominating Committee 4; Gregg Shorthand Tran- 
scription Certificate or 60 words per minute 3; 8o, 
100 anil 12s words per minute 4. 

Silence is sweeter than speech. 

KENNETH HOWE 

South Weymouth — Cabinet Making Kenny 
Class History Committee 4. 

H and some is that handsome docs. 



PAGE FIFTY-FOUR ^ 



RICHARD HOWES 

Weymouth Landing College Course Seth 

Football 2. 

Never worry; it doesn't pay. 

JEAN HI M RESS 

Weymouth College Course Jennie. Hunty 

Class Prophercy Committee 4; Secretary Advertising 
Staff 2. 3, 4; French Club 4; Hook Club 4; Senior 
Play 4; High Honors [, 2, 3, 4. 

genius, wherefore didst thou get thy brains? 



MICHAEL HYNES 

East Weymouth -Technical Caourse Mike, 'Aero Kid 
Intramural Baseball 1, -' ; Intramural Basketball 1, 2 ; 
Varsity Baseball 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Class 
History Committee 4; Honors 1,2, 3. 

His friends, he has many; 
His foes — has he any? 

MARGARET IXC, HAM 

Weymouth -Business Course 

Dorchester High for Girls 1; Braintree High 2, 3; 
Weymouth High 4; Usher at Senior Play 4. 
Like a picture in a book. 
Pure and peaceful is her look. 



DORIS JANELLE 

East Weymouth - College Course Dot 
Home Room Class Dues Collector 3, 4; Class Outing 
Committee 3; Home Room Messenger 4; Class Pro- 
phecy Committee 4; Senior Play Properties Com- 
mittee 4. 

Liked by all who know her. 

JACQUELINE JORDAN 

South Weymouth- - College Course Jackie, Ihumpcr 
Glee Club 1 ; Soft Ball 3; Reflector, Literary Staff 2; 
3, 4; Class History Committee 4; Senior Play 4; 
High Honors 1 ; Honors 2, 3, 4. 

Smile, and the world smiles with you. 



HELEN JOSE 

South Weymouth College Course Josic 
Senior Prom Committee 4; Junior Party Committee 
3; Class Dues Collector 4; Glee Club 2. 
A maid as fair as she 
Will never lonely be. 

JEAN JOSE 

South Weymouth — Business Course 
Basketball 1; Glee Club 1; Musical Revue i; Re- 
flector Advertising Staff 3; Class Will Committee 4; 
Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certificates for 60 
words per minute 3; So and 100 words 4. 

Mischief lurks in her eyes. 



VIRGINIA KALAGH AN 

NorthWeymouth — College Course i-inny. Ginna 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1; Glee Club I, 
2; Red Cross 2; Class Prophecy Committee 4. 
Tomorrow will be another day. 

BARBARA KELLEY 

South Weymouth - College Course Barb, Kcl 

Advertising Staff of Reflector 2 ; Student Council 
Assistant 4; Graduation Reception Committee 4; 
Fire Drill Duty 3, 4. 

Her disposition is as sunny as her hair. 

NOREEN KELLEY 

East Weymouth — Business Course Kel 
Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certificate for 60 
words per minute 3, 100 words 4. 

'Tis well to be honest to all. 

VIRGINA KELLEY 

Weymouth — -Business Course Ginny 
A smile for each, a friend to all. 




PAGE FIFTY-FIVE 




JOSEPH KEZER 

North Weymouth — Business Course Joe 
Baseball 3; Wrestling 2, 3, 4; Graduation Clothing 
Committee 4. 

It is a plague to be a handsome man. 

DALLAS KNIGHT 

North Weymouth — College Course Pal 
Class Prophecy Committee 4; Cross Country 4; Choir 
4 ; Senior Play 4. 
He is a perpetual surprise to those who know him 
best. 



JEANNETTE KNIGHT 

South Weymouth — Business Course Jean 
Who's Who Committee 4; Gregg Shorthand Tran- 
scription Certicates for 60 words and 80 words per 
minute 3; 100 and 120 words 4; Secretary to Mr. 
Nelson 4. 

Quiet, ever so quiet, but not unattractively so. 

CHRISTINE KNOLL 

North Weymouth — College Course Chris, Tina 

W ho's Who Committee 4; French Club 4; Honors I. 
Good nature is a charming virtue. 



EVERETT KOSARICK 

North Weymouth — College Course Ev 
Class Will Committee 4; Christmas Party 4; Junior 
Decorating Committee 3; Messenger at Football 
(James 2; Chemistry Lab Assistant 4; Book Room 
Attendant 3; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 3, 4; 4-H 
Club 1. 2. 3. 4; Choir 4; Senior Play 4; Honors 4. 
Some day I shall cast aside my boyish pranks and be 
a man. 

DOROTHY KUNZ 

Weymouth— General Course Dolly 
Christmas Party Committee 4. 

Mischief lurks in every dimple. 

GEORGE LABADIE 

East Weymouth — General Course Lab 
Class Marshall 4; Football 3, 4; Wrestling 2. 
Life without sports is not life. 

THEODORA LABRIOLA 

East Weymouth — Business Course Theo, Teddy 

Soft Ball, Captain 1; Volley Ball, Captain 2; Glee 
Club 2 ; Usher at Senior Play 4. 

Gum is a necessity of life. 



CATHERINE LEAHY 

East Weymouth — Business Course Kay, Katie 

(iirls' Glee Club 1; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for 60 and 80 words 3; 100 and 120 words 4; Who's 
Who Committee 4; Honors 1, 4. 

Gentle in manner, strong in performance 

DONALD LEAHY 

South Weymouth — General Course Don 
Junior Party Committee 3 ; Nominating Committee 
4; Graduation Reception and Dance 4; Intramural 
Basketball 1, 2. 

So live and laugh nor be dismayed. 



BARBARA LEARV 

South Weymouth — College Course Barb 
Class Prophecy 4; Glee Club 1, 2; Home Room Mes- 
senger 1; Musical Revue 1; Library Assistant 3; 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 3; Reflector 
Staff 2. 3, 4; Reflector Art Editor 4; High Honors 1. 
Gay good nature sparkles in her eyes. 

THOMAS LEARY 

South Weymouth College Course Ghoul 
Class History Committee 4; Honors 1. 3. 

He who invented work should have finished it. 



PAGE FIFTY-SIX 



WILLIAM LE1NONEN 

North Wetnouth —College Course Bill 
Class Will Committee- 4; lioolt Room Attendant ; 
Class Play 4; Honors I," 3, 3, 4. 

On him and his high endeavor, 

The light of promise shall shine forever. 

JOHN LENNOX 

East Weymouth Sheet Metal Lemon 
He'll surprise us yet. 

EDNA LEONARD 

South Weymouth - College Course Ed 
Glee Club I, 2; Musical Revue 1; Student Council 
Assistant 3, 4; Advertising Staff of Reflector 3; 
Class History Committee 4. 

A gentle maiden she, full calm and mannerly. 

RICHARD LIVINSTONE 

North Weymouth— College Course Red 
Class Will Committee 4. 

Peace rules the lad, where reason rules the mind. 

DONALD LYNCH 

Weymouth— College Course Don 
Student Council 2, 4; Student Council Assistant 3; 
Cross Country 3; Aviation Club 1. 
His amiable disposition has won Him tnany friends. 

ELINORE MACDONALD 

North Weymouth — Business Course Mac 
Glee Club i; Junior Outing Committee 3; Class Pro- 
phecy Committee 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for 80 and 100 and 120 words 4; Junior High School 
Office 3, 4; Weymouth Highlights Typist 4; Honors 

1. 2. 3, 4- 

Is everybody happy? 

VVILLENA MacKAY 

East Weymouth — General Course Willie 
Baddick Academy, Nova Scotia, 1, 2, 3; Honors 1; 
Glee Club 1, 2. 3; Weymouth High School 4. 

Friends should be preferred to kings. 

CATH I R I N E MacKE N /IE 

East Weymouth — Business Course Cathy Kay 

Graduation Reception and Dance Committee 4; Glee 
Club 1, 2, 3; Musical Revue 1,3; Girls' Glee Club 1. 

2. 3; Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certificate for 
60 and 80 words a minute 3; 100 and 120 words 4. 

In Kay, joy doth abound, 

We're always giggling when she's around. 

paul Mackenzie 

South Weymouth — General Course Mac 
Junior Nominating Committee 3; Class Prophecy 4 
A little work, a little play. 
That's how he likes to pass the day. 

vvilliam Mackenzie 

South Weymouth — Cabinet Making Mac 
Class Banquet Committee 4. 

A mind full of knowledge is a mind that never fails. 

RITA MACONOCHIE 

North Weymouth — Business Course Re Pat 

Spelling Bee 2; Home Room Messenger 2; Usher at 
Football Games 3; Gregg Transcription Certificates 
for 60 words 3; too words 4; Usher at Senior Play 4. 
Quiet, yet alert and full of fun. 

DORIS MAR I IN 

North Weymouth — Business Course Dot 
Glee Club 3, 4; Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certi- 
ficate for 60 words 3; Musical Revue 3; Usher at 
Senior Play 4; Honors t. 

She enjoys life in a quiet way. 




^ PAGE FIFTY'SEVEN 




91 

PAGH FIFTY'EIGHT ^ 



RUTH McPHEE 

South Weymoulh -Business Course Ruthie 
Home Room Messenger 3; Nominating Committee 4; 
Banquet Committee 4; Reflector Secretary 4; Choir 
4- 

Merit and modesty make good comrades. 

ROIW'.RI MERHMAN 

South Weymouth — Sheet Metal Bob 

I la^s Clothing Committee 4. 

A better friend is itci'cr to be found. 

\l \R [ORIE MICHAUD 

East Weymouth — Husiness Course Margie 
Jeremiah K. liurke High School for (iirls Boston 1 ; 
Glee Club i ; Christmas Party Committee 4; Choir 4; 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 words 3. 
A quiet girl whose nature never varies. 

LORRAINE MIELBYE 

South Weymouth — Business Course 
Student Council Assistant 3, 4; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 60 words 3; 100 words 4; Reflector 
Advertising Staff 2; Senior Prom Committee 4. 

Always cheerful, always kind, 

Such a girl we like to find. 

WILLIAM MORGAN 

South Weymouth — Sheet Metal Willie 

Graduation Reception and Dance Committee 4. 
Man is but what he knowcth . 

ROBERT MUGFORD 

North Weymouth — General Course Bob 
Radio Club 3; Projectionist Club 4; Class Banquet 
Wrong again, it must have been Russell. 

RUSSELL MUGFORD 

North Weymouth— General Course Russ 
Radio Club 3; Projectionist Club 4; Class Banquet 
Committee 4. 

But. can't you sec? It's Bob you want not me. 

JUNE MURLEY 

Weymouth — Business Course Shorty 
Mixed (ilee Club 1, 2; Girls' Glee Club 3; Musical 
Revue 1, 3; Class Motto Committee 4. 

June is always full af fun, 
Laughing and smiling with ci'cryonc 

MARY NAI'OLITANO 

North Weymouth — Business Course 
Framingham High School 1.2; Lost and Found Com- 
mittee 2; Bonds and Stamps Committee 2; Staff of 
the Memorator 1; Staff of the Student Crier 2; Class 
Treasurer 1 ; American Legion Award 1 ; Operetta 1 ; 
Weymouth High School 3, 4; Proof Reader of 
Reflector 3. 4; Honors 1. 3; Weymouth Highlights 
3. 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate for 100 words 4. 
Happiness courts thee in its best array 

ROY NELSON, JR. 

South Weymouth — College Course Bud 
l -her at Graduation 3; Band 1, 2; L'. S. Navy 4. 

A smile for each, 

A friend to all. 

ETHEL NICHOLAS 

East Weymouth — College Course Nicky 
Book Club 4; Reflector Art Staff 1; Home Room 
Messenger 1, 2. 

Art is the path of the creator of his work. 

MARION NICKERSON 

Weymouth Heights- College Course Nicky 
Who's Who Comimttee 4; Weymouth Highlights 
Staff 4 ; Home Room Messenger 1 ; Home Room 
Vice-President i ; Publicity Agent for Senior Play 
and Musical Revue 1, 2. 

Fair is she behold 



LAWRENCE MAR I IN 

South Weymouth Business Course Larry 
Grauation Clothing Committe .t. 

//c that hath knowledge spareth his words. 

DORO I MY MASISON 

Weymouth — Business Course Breezy 
Milton High School i. 2, 3; Weymouth High 3, 4; 
Photography Clul> 2. 3; Glee Cluh 1, 2, 3; Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for 60 and So words 3; 
100 words 4. 

Happy-go-lucky, come what may, 
Dot will go smiling on her way. 

VIRGINIA MA I III WSON 

North Weymouth Business Course Gina 
Home Room Spelling Dec Champion 1, 2; Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for 60 and 80 words 3; 
Class History 4; Honors .3 4. 

The sea! the seal the open sea! 

BERNICE M A I I SON 

Weymouth — Business Course Bunny 
Quincy High School 1 ; Dramatics 1 ; Junior Red 
Cross ;i Board of Health 1; Weymouth High School 
2, 3, 4; Glee Cluh 2; Class Motto Committee 4. 
Merrily, merrily shall I live. 

ARTHUR McCAFFER I \ 

South Weymouth — Sheet Metal Art 

Senior Prom Committee 4. 

A day for toil, an hour for sport, 
But for a friend is life too short. 

ihomas McCarthy 

South Weymouth — Sheet Metal Tom 
The tjood and the wise lead quiet lives. 

WILLIAM McCURD\ 

North Weymouth — General Course Bill 
Student Council Assistant 4; Senior Prom Commit- 
tee 4; Football 1. 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1; Wrestling 3. 
We like and admire him as a friend anil as an athlete. 

DANIEL McFARLAND 

East Weymouth — General Course Dan 
4 H Club 1. 2; Football 3; Christmas Party Commit- 
tee 4. 

Oh. why should life all labor be? 

\ N \ I M< GOVERN 

South Weymouth College Course 

Home Room Messenger 1, 4; Junior Nominating 
Committee 3; Home Room Treasurer 3. 4; Victory 
Hook Campaign 3; Book Club 3, 4. President 4; 
French Club 4; Accompanist for Music Periods 2, 4; 
Who's Who Committee Chairman 4; Honors 1, 2, 3. 4. 
In youth and beauty -wisdom is but rare. 

ELIZA BE III M( IN I OSH 

East Weymouth — Business Course Betty 
Home Room Messenger 1; Girls' Glee Club 2; Ad- 
vertising Staff of Reflector 2; Junior Party Com- 
mittee 3; Senior Prom Committee 4; Gregg Trans- 
cription Certificate for 60 words 3; 100 words 4; 
Fire Drill Duty 3, 4; Student Council Assistant 4. 

Her personality and her appearance are equally 

attract ice. 

FLORENCE McCLELLAN 

North Weymouth — Business Course Flossie 
Glee Club 1; Home Room Messenger 2; Junior Dec- 
orating Committee 3; Student Council Assistant 
2, 3; Advertising Staff of Reflector 3; Gregg Tran- 
scription Certificate for 60 words 3; Graduation 
Clothing Committee 4. 

pair of dimples, a pretty smile; 
For her, who would not walk a mile? 

LOIS M< MENIMON 

North Weymouth — Business Course Mickey 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 words 3. 
A good sport with a disturbing giggle. 




c^V, PAGE FIFTY'NINE 



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Mi 




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PAGE SIXTY «\a^ 



NICHOLAS NOCERA, JR. 

East Weymouth — Business Course Nick, Blackey 
Junior Varsity Football 3; Captain 3. 

The bliss e'etx of a moment still is bliss. 

LORRAINE NOLE 1 

North Weymouth — Business Course Laurie 
Home Room Messenger 1 ; Home Room President i ; 
Junior Decorating Committee 3; Graduation Cloth- 
ing Committee 4. 

Sugar and spice, 

And all things nice. 

RI 1 A O'NEIL 

South Weymouth — Busines Course 
Home Room Messenger i ; Assistant Student Council 
4; Fire Drill Duty 3, 4; Junior Decorating Com- 
mittee 3; Senior Nominating Committee 4; Senior 
Reception Comittee 4; Gregg Shorthand Transcrip- 
tion Certificate for 60 words a minute 3; Honors 2. 
The cheerful live longest in years. 

RU 1 H O'NEILL 

South Weymouth — College Course Rutltie 
Home Nursing Course 2; Reflector Advertising 
Staff 2; Junior Party Committee 3; Book Club 3; 
Class Prophecy Committee 4; French Club 4; 
Weymouth Highlights Staff 4; Honors 1. 

Life's a pleasant institution. 

Let's take it as it comes. 

SIDNEY O'LEARY 

East Weymouth — Sheet Metal 
Basketball 3; Class Will Committee 4. 

Success is his goal. 

NATALIE O l IS 

North Weymouth — Business Course Nat 
Senior Play 4; Gregg Shorthand Transcription Cer- 
tificate for 60 words a minute 3. 

A friend zehosc heart has eyes to sec. 

MARILYN PALLIS 

East Weymouth — Business Course 
Weymouth Highlights 4; Gregg Shorthand Trani- 
cription Certificate for 60 and 80 words a minute 3; 
100 words 4. 

Ambition has no rest. 

WILLIAM PAN OR A 

North Weymouth — General Course Bill 
Up, up! my friend, and quit your books! 

NICHOLAS PAPPAS 

North Weymouth — General Course Nick 
Track Team 1, 2; Junior Decorating Committee 3; 
Orchestra 4; Class Prophecy Committee 4; Honors 2, 
3- 

A most efficient man with music in his soul. 

YVONNE PETIPAS 

North Weymouth — Business Course Von 

Glee Club 1. 

With such a comrade, such a friend, 
I fain would zealk 'til journey's end. 

ROBERT PETZE 

East Weymouth— General Course Bob 
North Quincy High School Baseball 1; Weymouth 
Higli School 2. 3. 4; Baseball 2, 3; Army Air Force 
4- 

Laugh your way through life. 

RUTH PITTS 

South Weymouth— Business Course Ruthic 
Stetson High School, Randolph 1; Glee Club 1; 
Weymouth High School 2, 3, 4; Senior Play 4. 
A good talker, even more than a good orator, implies 
a good audience 



[RI NE PLOURDE 

East Weymouth General Course 
lloiiie R(joiii Messenger i; Glee Club i; Junior 
Decorating Committee 3; Senior Christmas Party 
Committee 4. 

Lovely to look at; delightful to know. 

JAM. POLSON 

South Weymouth - College Course 

Hook Club 3, 4; Senior Play 4; Senior Christmas 

Party 4. 

When my cue comes, call me and I will answer. 

BEVERLY PR A I I 

East Weymouth — General Course . Bcv 

Class Motto Committee 4. 

She can boast a fine ambition. 

That of a nurse's tradition. 

JOSEPH PRATT 

South Weymouth — Agricultural Course Joe, Asa 
Football 4. 

A quiet unassumiutj chap who will go far. 

DAW QUINNAM 

South Weymouth Printing Dana 

Class Banquet Committee 4. 

A good pal is long remembered 

JOANNE RALPH 

South Weymouth — College Course Gee — Gee 

Junior Nominating Committee 3; Class Dues Col- 
ler-tor 3, 4; Book Club 3, 4; Home Nursing Certifi- 
cate 2; Weymouth Highlights 4. 

Silence is more eloquent than words. 

VAUGHN RALPH 

South Weymouth — Auto Repair Ozzie 

Class History Committee 4. 

A true friend and helper. 

GERTUDE RENNIE 

North Weymouth — General Course Ren 
Glee Club t; Home Room Messenger 3; Graduation 
Student Council 4. Reception and Dance Committee 
4; Reflector Staff 4- 

Quiet, serene, and placid. 

DORIS RESENDES 

East Weymouth — Business Course 
Class Prophecy Committee 4; Volleyball; Softball; 
Senior Play 4; Weymouth Highlights 4; Gregg 
Shorthand Transcription Certificate for 60 words a 
minute 3. 

Joy rises in her, like a summer's morn. 

SHIRLEY RICE 

East Weymouth — Business Course Shorty 
Bucksports High School. Maine 1, 2; Who's Who 2 ; 
Commercial Club 2; Basketball 2; Glee Club 2; Play 
(Silas Marner) 2; Weymouth High School 3, 4: 
Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certificate for 60 
words a minute 3; 80 and 100 words a minute, 4. 
As high as my heart. 

WILLIAM ROBER 

Weymouth Heights — College Course Bill 
Wrestling 1, 2. 3. 4; Track Manager 1; Cross Coun- 
try Manager 2, 3; Intramural Basketball 2. 
Earnest effort carries a man far. 

STANLEY ROBERTSON 

East Weymouth College Course Stan 
Home Room Red Cross Sollicitor 1 ; Advertising 
Staff of Reflector 3; Junior Decorating Committee 3; 
Junior Party Committee 3; Atheletic Committee of 
Highlights 4; Intramural Basketball 1; Wrestling 1, 
2, 3, 4; Manager 1. Captain 3, 4; Winter Track 1, 2; 
.Soring Track 1. 2. 3; Cross Country 2. 3. 4; Junior 
Varsity 3; Senior Play 4; Graduation Reception and 
Dance Committee 4. 

Thou ah his size is small. 

He's liked by all. 




PAGE SIXTY-ONH 




LEONARD RUSSO 

East Weymouth Printing 
Class lianquet Committee 4. 

Do unto others as they do unto you. 



Lenny 




BARBARA SAMPSON 

Weymouth Heights — College Course Barb 
Book Club 3 ; French Club 4; Senior Play 4; Reflector 
Staff 2, 3; Class History Committee Chairman 4; 
Home Room Messenger 2, 4; Weymouth Highlights 
4; First Aid Course 2; Honors 1, 2, 3. 

A true friend is forever a friend. 



FREDERIC SARGENT 

North Wemouth- -General Course Fred 
Mechanic Arts High, Boston 1, 2; Track Captain I, 
2; Weymouth High 3, 4. 

Some love to roam o'er the dark sea's foam, 
Where the shrill winds whistle free. 

DOROTHY SCHROMM 

North Weymouth — Business Course Dot 
Who's Who Committee 4; Gregg Shorthand Trans- 
cription Certficate for 60 words a minute 3; 80 words 
and 100 words, 4; Honors 1, 2. 

Thy lovely hair my heart enchained. 



CARL SCHULER 

North Weymouth — Auto Mechanics Buster, Herman 
Class Nominating Committee 4; Vocational School 
President 4. 

Calm, cool and collected. 
ANNA SCOTT 

Weymouth— Business Course Scotttie 
Basketball 1; Mixed Glee Club 1. 

Genius is the capacity of evading hard work. 



WILLIAM SCRIBNER 

East Weymouth — General Course Scrib 
Book Room 4; Assistant Student Council 3. 4; 
Wrestling 4; Honors 2; Graduation Clothing Com- 
mittee 4. 

Clothes make the man. 



CARL SEPPALA 

Weymouth— College Course 

The answer to a maiden's prayer 



Mike 



LOIS SHAW 

North Weymouth — Business Course Shorty 
Senior Nominating Committee 4; Class Will 4; Secre- 
tary to Miss Chase 4; Gregg Shorthand Transcription 
Certificate for 60 and 80 words a minute 3, 100 
words 4; Honors 1. 3. 

Good things come in small packages. 

CATHERINE SHEEHAN 

North Weymouth — Business Course Kay 
Woodward School for Girls 1 ;Glee Club 1; Camera 
Club 1 ; Athletic Club 1 ; Weymouth High School 2, 3, 
4; Senior Christmas Party Committee 4; Glee Club 2; 
Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certificate for 60 
and 80 words a minute 3. 

Laugh and the world laughs with you 

ALFRED SHEEHY 

East Weymouth — College Course Al 
Class History Committee 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; 
French Club President 4. Honors 1, 2, 3. 

Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo? 

MARGARET SHERWOOD 

Weymouth Heights — College Course Peggy 
Class Motto Committee 4; Class Banquet Committee 
4; Reflector Advertising Committee 2, 3; Book Club 
3; Weymouth Highlights 4; Home Room Messenger 
r; First Aid Course 2; Honors 1. 

Quiet, yet alert and full of fun. 



PAGE SIXTY-TWO <\g^ 



ELEANOR SIMONDS 

North Weymouth Business Course Lucky 
Christmas Party 4; Gregg Shorthand Transcription 

Certificate for 60 and 80 words a minute 3; [00 words 
4- 

A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance. 
CARRIE SI ROOM A \ 

East Weymouth Business Course Kay 
Basketball i; Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certifi- 
cate for 60 an So words a minute 3; 100 words 4; 
Weymouth Highlights Committee 4. 

Not very tall, and not very small. 
Just a good sport and friend to all. 



LEON SIROONIAN 

East Weymouth —General Course 
Wrestling 3, 4. 

Sir, I would rather he right than be President. 



Leo 



FRANCIS SLATTERY 

East Weymouth— General Course Jabber 

Football 3, 4; Baseball 3; Basketball 4; Track 3; 
Student Council President 3, 4; Junior Nominating 
Committee 3; Junior Party Committee 3; Senior 
Christmas Party Committee 4; Senior Reception 
Committee 4. 

We arc sure he will never sit 
When there is any time for wit. 



DOROTHY SLOAN E 

Weymouth Landing— Business Course Pottic 
Basketball 1, 2. 3; Volleyball 1, 2. 3; Softball r, 2, 3; 
Reflector 1 ; Graduation Clothing Committee 4. 
Why study history — / make it! 

CARRIE SMITH 

North Weymouth- -General Course 
Home Room Messenger 2; Junior Decorating Com- 
mittee 3; Senior Prom 4. 

Never miss enjoyment for homework ! 



JOHN SMITH 

North Weymouth - Sheet Metal Course 

A faithful friend is the medicine of life. 

RAYMOND SMITH 

North Weymouth— Sheet Metal Course Smithy 
Class Prophecy Committee 4. 

A good companion makes good company. 



MA /IE SPINELLA 

East Weymouth — Home Economics Course 
liaseball 3. 

The good and the wise lead quiet lives. 



Mac 



JUNE STEELE 

South Weymouth- Business Course 
Girls' Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Mixed Glee Club 1, 2, 3; 
Home Room Messenger 3; Gregg Shorthand Trans- 
cription Certificate for 60 words a minute 3; 80 words 
4- 

Her voice was ever soft, gentle, and low. 



RICHARD S I I IN 

North Weymouth — College Course Dick 
Football [, 2, 3, 4; Spring Track 1; Winter Track 2; 
Wrestling 3; Class Vice-President 3; Class President 
4; Lunch Room Duty; Fire Drill 3, 4; Home Room 
Messenger 4. 

A rollicking good nature is an amiable weakness. 

VERNE STENBERG 

Weymouth Landing — Business Course 
Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certificate for 60 
words a minute 3; 100 words 4; Girls Glee Club 1. 
Silence, more musical than any song. 




c-sv, PAGE SIXTY-THREE 











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Mel !5« ill 


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J # L 


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ROSE-MARIE STOKES 

Kast Weymouth- - Business Course Squccky 
Junior Party Committe 3; Who's Who Committee 4; 
Weymouth Highlights 4; Senior Nominating Com- 
mittee 4. 

A laughing eye, a merry smile 
Will always make a girl worthwhile. 



Business Course Edie 
2, 3; Gregg Shorthand Transcrip- 



I 1)1 I 1 1 STONE 

South Weymouth 
Girls' Glee Club 1 

tion Certificate for 60 words a minute 3; 80 and 
100 words 4; Class Will Committee ; Honors 3. 
A sweet disposition has she, 
And a friend to all she will ever he. 

EDNA SULLIVAN 

Weymouth Landing — Business Course Kit 
Reflector Staff 1 ; Gregg Shorthand Transcription 
Certificate for 60 and 80 words a minute 3; 100 words 
4- 

Her quiet dignity and simple way 
Win her admiration every day. 

EDWARD SLLLIVAN, JR. 

East Weymouth — General Course Sully 
Trouble runs off him like water from a duck's back. 

JOHN SULLIVAN 

North Weymouth — Business Course Sully 
Home Room Messenger 1; Senior Prom Committe 4; 
Football 3, 4; Baseball 3. 

His selection of ties is the pride of his eyes. 

DONALD SYLVIA 

Weymouth Landing — College Course Tiny 
Musical Revnue 3; High Honors 1, 2, 3; Honors 4. 
Quietness often shows worth. 

CONSTANCE TEDESCO 

East Weymouth — General Course Connie 
Oliver Wendell Holmes Junior High School, Roxbury 
Radio Club 1; Mission Church High School, Roxbury 
2. 3; Debating Team 3; Catholic Students' Mission 
Crusade 2, 3; Glee Club 2, 3; Latin Club 3; Wey- 
mouth High School 4; Class Banquet Committee 4; 
Choir 4; Book Club 4; Usher at Senior Play 4. 
To do easily what is difficult fur others is the mark 
of talent. 



THOMAS THURSTON 

East W'eymouth — Auto Repair 

Basketball 1, 2, 4. 

A day's work will hurt no one. 



I'atsy 



JANET TOOZE 

North Weymouth — General Course Jan 
Softball 3; Musical Revue 3; Volleyball 2; Basketball 
2; Drum Majorette 4. 

A cute little miss with a winning smile, 
Who will win her way for many a mile. 

BARBARA TOWLE 

South Weymouth — General Course 

Glee Club 3; Choir 4; Band 4; French Club 4; Red 

Cross Home Nursing Certificate 2; Honors 1, 3, 4. 

JESSIE TRUMBULL 

Weymouth Landing — Business Course Jess 
Home Room Secretary 1 ; Spelling Bee Champion 
3; Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certificate for 60 
and 80 words a minute 3; 100 words 4; Secretary to 
Mr. Nelson 4; Glee Club 1 ; Honors 1, 2, 3. 

Sometimes grave and somtimcs gay, 

But we love her any way. 

SHIRLEY VENTRE 

East Weymouth — Business Course Shirl 
Press Club 1; Advertising Committe 1,2; Girls' Glee 
Club 1, 2; Mixed Glee Club 2, 3; Musical Revue 3; 
Gregg Shorthand Transcription Certificate for 60 
words a minute 3; 80 and 100 words 4; Weymouth 
[highlights 4; Class Motto Committee 4. 

A happy disposition is a gift of nature. 



PAGE SIXTY-FOUR ^ 



LORRAINE VOIG I 

Weymouth Landing llusineu Course 

Home Room Messenger 3; Who's Who Committee 4: 

t.regg Shorthand Transcription Certificate for ,„, 
and So words a minute 3; '<<■> and 120 words 1; Hon 
orary Member of Monday Club 4; High Honors 1, a 
3t 4- 

Smart, capable, and demure, 

She'll make a success we're very sure. 

MARJORIE WARD 

Weymouth Landing Busine: 
Basketball 1, 2. 

It hurtcth not the tongue 



\s Course Margie 
to give fair words. 



MIL I ON WATTS 

East Weymouth— College Course Wattsie 
Spelling Bee Home Room Winner Cross Country 
3. 4; rrack 3. 4; Senior Play 4; Graduation Clothing 
Committee 4. 

Better late than never. 

[RENE WEISSLINGER 

South Weymouth— College Course Ronnie 
Hoik Club 3. 4; Vice-President 4; Reflector Staff • 
3. Editor-in-Chief 4; Senior Nominating Committee 
4; Honors 2, 3, 4; High Honors 1. 

*** on 'y w "y to have a friend is to be one. 



MABLE WHALEY 

South Weymouth— College Course 
Junior Nominating Committee 4; Clasi 
mittee 4; Softball 3; Home Room Spe 
ner 2; High Honors 1, 2, 3, 4; Reflect, 
4. 

We think she's quiet, we think she's meek 
It e love shy blushes on her check. 



ing Be 
Staff 



ANNA WHITE 

Weymouth Landing — Busi 



Ann 



A modest, retiring maid is she 
As shy and timid as one can be. 



NORMAN WHITTLE 

Weymouth Landing— College Course Normic 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Laboratory Assistant 3, 4; Grad- 
uation Reception and Dance Committee 4; Lighting 
Effects in Hall ,, 2, 3, 4; Football Movies ,; Honors 
1. 2, 3, 4- 

A quiet boy you think you sec, 
When you take a look at me. 

EARLE WILLIAMSON 

South Weymouth — General Course Willi 

Book Room Duty 2, 3, 4; Class Will Committee 4: 

Senior Play 4; Intramural Basketball 2, 3; Honors 
1,4; Reflector Staff 4. 

Character is the key to fortune. 

DOLORES WOLFERT 

Weymouth Landing— General Course Dec 
Home Room Messenger 2; Glee Club 2; Junior De- 
corating Committee 3; Usher at Senior Play 4. 
Skill and confidence are an uncouquercd army. 





c^l, PAGE SIXTY-FIVE 



The Perfect Senior 



Boy 

Hair — Carl Seppala 
Eyes — Donald Coffee 
Smile — Joseph Covcney 
Intellect — Edward Dalto 
Stature — Richard Stein 
Dignity — George Gould 
Humor — Richard Cote 
Disposition — Charles Fletcher 
Voice — Arthur Mc Cafferty 
Sportsmanship — Joseph Coveney 
Clothes — Albert Healey 
Pep — Richard Cote 
Dependability — Edward Dalto 
Naivete — William Leinonen 
Complexion — Carl Seppala 
Brutality — John Butler 



Girl 

Hair - Rita O'Neil 
Eyes — Mane Burkett 
Smile — Barbara Kellcy 
Intellect — Mabel Whaley 
Dignity — Anne McGovern 
Disposition — Priscilla Hilliard 
Sense of Humor — Virginia Kalaghan 
Voice - Pauline Barnes 
Spottsmanship — Virginia Crossman 
Cleverness — Barbara Leary 
Friendliness — Priscilla Hilliard 
Clothes — Betty Gannon 
Complexion — Claire Heaver 
Pep — Janet Tooze 
Trustworthiness — Irene Weisslinger 
Figure — Shirley Babcock 



PAGE SIXTY-SIX ^ 



I First Row: M. Merten, B. Nickerson, D. Beazley. M. Gourley, R. Cote, B. Leary. I. Weisslinger, A. Bongarzone. 
V. Wright, V. Wattson, B. Kilburn, C. Heaver, A. ElKtrom; Second Row: J. Barker, P. Farr, R. O'Neil. H. An- 
derson, P. Miller, C. Chambers, M. Reidy, N. Page. J. de Willoughby, T. Carriere, H. Toomev; Third Row: E. 
Williamson, B. Jordan, J. George, N. Duncan, M. Napolitano, G. Rennie, H. Billard, S. Fisher. P. Gauley, K. 
Weeks; Fourth Row: Miss Chase, E. Forest, K. Thornberg, M. Whaley. J. Jordan. H. Cowett, L. Blackburn. P. 
Hilliard, J. Walsh; Fifth Row: M. Mcintosh, A. Boyle, R. O'Neil, B. Kelley, E. Leonard, Mr. Steele; Sixth Row: 
D. Almquist, G. Fitzgerald, Mr. Brown. 



Reflector 

I3ecau.se of the shortage of material caused by the war, the Reflector has had to be 
considerably reduced in size. Nevertheless, by our choice of material, we have en- 
deavored to prove that "it's not the quantity but the quality that counts." In the lim- 
ited space permitted us, we have attempted to present articles which seemed to rep- 
resent best the spirit of our school life. The Year Book is the fifth issue published in 
the current year. 

We wish to express our gratitude to Mr. Prescott Brown, Miss Helen Chase.Mr. 
James Steele, Mr. Harry Duncan, the printing department of the Vocational School, 
and the student body for their splendid co-operation. 

May the Reflector Staffs of the future have successful years and soon be able to 
work under peace-time regulations. 



PAGE SIXTY-EIGHT 



First Row: P. Milliard. C. Curtis, B. Hearn, B. Loud, M. Kelly, H. Casciani, S. Brennan; Back Row: J. Dalto, R. 
Caruso, D. Lynch, E. Caracciolo, E. Adams, R. Carter. 



Student Council 

Since 1931, a Student Council has been elec ted annually. Five representatives from 
each class, both boys and girls, are < hosen to keep order in the cafeteria lines, corri- 
dors, and fire drills. Mr. Lyons, our assistant principal, is in charge of this group and 
their activities. 

Beside their regular duties, they have been called upon to decide certain mat- 
ters concerning the student body, since they are representatives and can express the 
feelings and ideas of their fellow students. 

There is also an Assistant Student Council, to help in the lunch room. These 
assistants are appointed by the Council. 

As has been the custom for the past years, the Student Council sponsored an 
Athletic Dance. This year the Victory Dance took place in December, at which time 
many of the students enjoyed themselves, dancing to the music of Mel Eddy and his 
music-makers. 

The officers elected among the Student Council members this year are as fol- 
lows: president, Francis Slattery; vice-president, Prise ilia Hilliard; and secretary, 
Carol Curtis. 



c^V, PAGE SIXTY'NINE 



First Row: J. Poison, E. Kosarick, J. deWiUoughby, Miss Chase, J. Jordan, E. Dalto, P. Barnes. E. Williamson; 
Second Row: D. Cifford, R. Pitts, J. Goodwin, A. Boyle. J. Huntress, P. Holbrook, N. Otis, S. Fleming, S. Robert- 
son, D. Cote; Back Row: D. Knight, W. Leinonen, C. Curtis, P. Calen, N. Cheney, M. Watts. 



Senior Play 



n the nights of February Hi and March 2, the Senior Class presented the 
three-act comedy "Youth Takes Over," written by Betty Smith and Robert Finch. 
Miss Helen Chase directed the production. 

The plot centres around a high-school senior, Albert Williams, who never 
ceases to get into trouble. The reaction of Albert's teachers and his fellow pupils 
to his pranks adds to the humorous portrayal. The new principal, Dr. Pierson, 
tries to reform Albert by means of responsibility. How Albert is blamed for various 
mishaps and how the complications are straightened out make an appealing story. 



MISS GUNTHER 


June de Willoughby 


MISS STICKNEY 


Jean Huntress 


MRS. RATHBONE 


Jane Poison 


MRS. (ONES 


Carol Curtis 


ETHEL 


Jacqueline Jordan 


SNOOKY PHI PI'S 


Pauline Barnes 


DITSIE BRICE 


Norma Cheney 


MRS. THURSTON 


Pauline Holbrook 


PEGGY BROWN 


Audrey Bo\ le 


BETTY BROWN 


Barbara Sampson 


GLORIA 


Phyllis Calen 


BARBARA 


Jean Davis 


HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS 


Natalie Otis 




Ruth Pitts 




Dorothy Goodwin 




Sherrard Fleming 




Doris Resendes 


POP 


Everett Kosarick 


DORCTOR PIERSON 


Earle Williamson 


MR. ANDERSON 


Milton Watts 


SWINBURNE JONES 


William Leinonen 


ALBERT WILLIAMS 


Edward Dalto 


GUS LANDERS 


Donald Cote 


TED BARRY 


Dallas Knight 


LENNY ELLIS 


Richard GifTord 


HENRY 


Stanley Robertson 


THE POSTMAN 


Robert Casey 




First Row: P. Estabrook, B. Burrell, Jean Carr, I). Garafolo, D. Goodwin, A. Ellstrom, R. O'Neil, M. Nickerson, 
E. Sargent, F. Slattery. C. Chambers; Second Row: K. Ellstrom, M. Armstrong, P. Harkins, C. Siropnian, S. 
\'entre. J. Ralph, N. Duncan, S. Fisher, E. Simonds, K. Heger; Third Row: D. Almquist, J. George, F. Fortier, 
M. Ferullo. E. MacDonald, L. Starrett, N. Butler; Fourth Row: D. Resnick, S. Robertson, D. Cote, B. Sampson, 
M. Sherwood, A. (iarside, D. Erickson, Mr. Steele. 



Highlights 

The staff of the Weymouth Highlights has concluded its second year of publi- 
cation. We have endeavored to inform boys in the service of the where abouts 
of their fellow classmates and to report the news of school and town activities. 

We of the Highlights wish to convey our most hearty thanks to the faculty 
advisers, Miss Pearson, Miss Silvester, Miss Hackett, and Mr. Steele for their assis- 
tance and untiring service. We also wish to thank the teachers and pupils who con- 
tributed letters and news. 

To the staff of next year's Highlights we extend sincere wishes for success, and 
the hope that the members will find the pleasure in their work that we have found 
in ours. 



c^l, PAGE SEVENTY-ONE 



First Row: R.Evans. L. Sgon, D. Cain, A. Cipullo, W. Sloan. B. Lindsay, R. Summers; Second Row: E. Tierney, 
P. Sheperd, S. Shepherd, li. Paulson, H. Pike. I. Fallgren. C. Palmer, M. Keehan, S. Fisher, E. Wardwell. R. 
Mc Auliffe. A. Sheehan. R. Swan; Hack Row: E. Kosarick, W. Alison. R. Whittle. I). Whittemore, R. Holbrook, 
D. Jieckes, C. Mc Kenzie, F. Butler, W. Mills, R. King, W. Montgomery, R. Shaw. 



Under its new director, Mr. Russell Jack, our orchestra has had a most successful 
season. There has been a great increase also in the number of members this year. 
Again it has provided accompaniment for the Senior Play, and has presented a 
.Spring Concert, which was well attended. 

There are six first violins, lour second violins, two cellos, one piano, two (lutes, 
seven clarinets, five cornets, one alto saxophone, one tenor saxophone, one alto horn, 
two trombones, three drums, one bass, and one timpani. This year the orchestra 
has been playing pieces by such composer as Sc hlepegrell, Borowski, Tschaikowsky, 
Zamecnik, and Herfurth. 

We all wish the returning members, along with the newcomers, an even better 
season next year. 



Orchestra 




MEMBERS OF THE ORCHESTRA 



First Violins 
[ngrid Fallgren 
Mary Lou Keohan 
William Mills 
William Montgomery 
Heloise Pike 
Russell Shaw 



Hiilrs 

William Alison 
Salh Fisher 



Alio Saxophone 
Robert Kin" 



Clarinets 



Tenor Saxophone 
Philip Shepherd 



Raymond Holbiook 



Francis Butlei 



llto Horn 
Richard Evans 



Second Violins 
David Cain 
Lais Egon 
John O'Brien 
Francis Payne 



Carlton McKenzie 
Charleen Palmer 
Shirley Shepherd 
Richard Summers 



Trombones 
Deane Beckes 
Edward Tieincs 



Cello 

Everett kosarick 
1 liner W trdwell 



Bruce Lindsay 



Donald Whittemore 



Drums 
Thomas Petze 
Gardiner Rogers 
Ri( hard Swan 



Robert McAuliffe 
Mai jorie Pearson 
William Sloan 



Bass 

Harlan Stone 



f in no 

Elizabeth Paulson 



Richard Whittle 



Timpani 
Albert Sheehan 



PAGE SEVENTY-TWO <\&^ 




First Row: Roy Peterson. Joseph Nevins, James Burke, William Jackson. David Resnick, Robert MacAulif'fe, 
Richard Swan. Richard Evans, James Imlach, Bruce Lindsey. Richard Thayer, Janet Tooze. William Sloan; 
Second Row: R. Cass. Albert Sheehan, Shirley Reidy. Katherine Madden, Clayton Stone, Alma Brown, Don 
Whittemore, Virginia Gauley, Eilene Kezer, Margaret Reidy, Sail} Fisher, Shirley Ventre, Harlan Stone. Richard 
Whittle. Raymond Holbrook, Edward Smith, Richard Sylvia, Ronald Maori; Third Row: Richard Summers, 
William Thayer, Shirley Lynch, Marjorie Pearson. Barbara Towle, Francis Butler, Leo Boyle. Russell Steele, 
Everett Kosarick, Paul McCarthy; Fourth Row: Jack Clancy. Robert Kins;. Carlton McKenzie, William Allison, 
Charlene Palmer, Patricia Weeks, Carolyn Thompson, Richard Karnan; Fifth Row: F. Borax. Edward Tierney, 
Philip Shepherd. Florence Fortier, Wayne Burgess, Sally Matthews, Donald Dutson, Francis Johnson, Gardiner 
Rogers, Thomas Fisher. 



Band 



U nder the inspiring leadership of Mr. Russell jack, the band has increased in size 
and scope and completed a very successful year. 

Included in its many activities are playing at the football games, the dedication 
of the Honor Roll, the Musical Conceit given in May, a tour of the Weymouth 
grade schools, and graduation. 

In the band there are sixteen clarinets, two Utiles, ten cornets, three basses, 
four saxophones, five trombones, nine drums, and two oboes. 

Best wishes to Weymouth High's musicians Eor future successes! 

MEMBERS OF THE BAND 



Clarinets 

Alma Brown 
Francis Butler 
Thomas Fisher 
Virgina Gauley 
Raymond Holbrook 
William Jackson 
Francis Johnson 
Robert Lyons 
Charleen Palmer 
Robert Peterson 
David Resnick 
Philip Shepherd 
Shirley Shepherd 
Clayton Stone 
Patricia Weeks 
Donald Whittemore 



Flutes 

William Alison 
Sally Fisher 



Cornets 

Franklin Boraks 
Leo Bo\ le 
Barbara James 
Bruce Lindsay 
Robert McAuliffe 
Marjorie Pearson 
W illiam Sloan 
W illiam Smith 
Richard Thayer 
Richard Whittle 

Basses 

Everett Kosarick 
Russell Steele 
Harlan Stone 

Saxophones 
Richard L\ ans 
James Imlach 
Robert King 
Carlton McKenzie 



Trombones 
Deane Beckes 
Richard Cass 
Shirley Lynch 
Ronald Macri 
Edward Tierney 



Drums 

James Burke 
Jack Clancy 
Paul McCarthy 
Joseph Nevins 
Gardiner Rogers 
Albei t Sheehan 
Richard Swan 
Carolyn Thompson 
Barbara Towle 

Oboe 
Richard Summers 
William Thayer 




First Row : Constance Tedesco. Constance Fryer. Ruth Jordan. Eunice Buckley. Dolores Wolfert, Jenny Lysa- 
kowski, Rita O'Neil, Eleanor McCafferty. Shirley Osborn, Estelle Dussault. Barbara Fraser; Second Row: Donald 
Hannaford, Marjorie Littlefield, Phyllis Farr, Dorothy Chellis, Thalia Pappageorge, Marjorie Michaud, Phyllis 
Pingree. Pauline Barnes. Phyllis Calen. Elizabeth Paulson; Third Row: James Allison. Arthur McCafferty. William 
Mills, Elizabeth Stein. Janet Pracejus, Beverly Wood, Heloise Pike; Fourth Row: Martin Engberg, Ronald Macri, 
Ernest Remondini, Natalie Duncan, Nancy Cain, Patricia Weeks, William Dwyer, Darrel Smith; Fifth Row: 
Alice Mathieu, Shirley Mathewson, Sally Mathews, Carolyn Thompson, Robert Karnan. 



Choir 

The Weymouth High School choir has enjoyed a pleasant year tinder its new di- 
rector, Mr. Jack. Besides taking part in several special high school programs, it has 
performed, along with the band and orchestra, in a concert given lor the Rotary 
Club and also for the Spring Musical. All members are looking forward to another 
enjoyable year. 

MEMBERS OF THE CHOIR 



First Sopranos 


First Alios 


Basses and Tenors 


Eunice Buckley 


Elizabeth Anderson 


James Alison 


Natalie Duncan 


fane Barker 


Warren Barrett 


Eleanor McCafferty 


Nartcy Cain 


Paul Doble 


Shirley Osborn 


Pin His Fai r 


John Dyer 


Barbara Smith 


Mat jot ie Littlefield 


Xeil Duncan 


Constance Tedesco 


Jenney Lysakowski 


Martn Engberg 




Sally Mathews 


Charles Evirs 




Ruth McPhee 


Presley Foster 




Marjorie Michaud 


Donald Hannaford 


Second Sopranos 


Rita O'Neil 


Kenneth Howe 


Pauline Barnes 


1 lizabeth Paulson 


Ronald Mat i i 


Dorothy Chellis 


Phyllis Pingree 


Arthui MiCallerly 


Estelle Dussault 


Second Alios 


William McKenzie 


Ruth Jordan 


Barbara Frasei 


William Mills 


Shirley Mathewson 


Alice Mathieu 


Conrad Reed 


Heloise Pike 


1 halia Pappageorge 


Ernest Remondini 


Carol) n 1 hompson 


Janet Pracejus 


Frank Robei tson 


Patrie ia Weeks 


Elizabeth Stein 


DarreH Smith 


Dolores Wolfei l 


Beverly Wood 


Waldo I in ell 



ROBERT KARNAN, Piano Accompanist 



PAGE SEVENTY-FOUR ^ 




Book Club 

Book Club, under the direction oJ Miss Freeman, has completed its eighth 
year. The members include both juniors and seniors. On the first Monday of each 
month, the meetings were held, at which the sec retary's reports were read, plans for 
the next meeting were made, and hook reports were given. Then the members dis- 
cussed various books, alter whi< h there was entertainment. 

At one meeting the Book Club had as its guest, Miss Petrucci, who spoke about 
her poetry; and at another, Miss Gloster, from Tufts Library, who told about the 
various processes a book undergoes before it reac hes the library shelf. The club also 
had moving pictures. 

Although there was not a large group this year, every girl enjoyed herself. 

The officers for the year were: 

President: Anne McGovern 
Vice President: frene Weisslinger 
Secretary: Eunice Buckley 



c^3V, PAGE SEVENTY-FIVE 



Front Row: O. Chroniack. B. Towle, S. Kemp, D. Dutson, M. Corbo. J. Casey, J. Perrow, B. Nickerson; Second 
Row: C. Knoll, R. O'Neil. B. Sampson, L. Stagliola. H. Toomey, A. McGovern, B. Freeman, M. Corridan; Third 
Row: J. Huntress, S. Mcintosh, A. Boyle, M. Mcintosh, H. Boutilier, M. Merten. 



Ihe meetings of the French Club, in which games and entertainment were en- 
joyed, were under the direction of Miss Ernestine Canning. 

An entertainment committee had something new and interesting arranged for 
each gathering. At Christmas time, there was a party during which French Christmas 
carols were sung and delicious refreshments served. Two club members put on a 
skit at this occasion. At other meetings the members played beano and other games 
in a French fashion. Among the many enjoyable gatherings was that at which Miss 
Canning showed slides on places of interest that she had visited in France. During 
the year, the club lost its president, Alfred Sheehy, who is now attending college, 
and its secretary, William Burdon, who is now in the armed forces. They were re- 
placed by Marguerite Corbo, president, and James Casey, secretary. Donald Dut- 
son was the treasurer throughout the year. 



French Club 




PAGE SEVENTY^SIX 




First Row: D. Cote, N. Whittle. W. McCurdy. R. Stein, R. Clark, J. Butler, F. Slattery; Rack Row: E. Dalto, 
B. Hunt, G. Gould, Captain J. Coveney, Coach Paul Sweeny. 



Football 



lthough the Football Team this year was not so successful as that of last year, 
spirit ran high in Weymouth. The team started off in full force, defeating Braintree 
30-0, and Haverhill ()-(). Then Weymouth fell the victim to Belmont 7-6, and 
Brookline 19-0, but came roaring back in the next few weeks to defeat North Quincv 
6-0, trounce Quincy 25-0, and wallop Cambridge Latin 34-0. Again Weymouth was 
defeated, this time by a last minute Arlington pass, but the next Saturday, favored 
Dedham had all it could do to hold a fighting-mad Weymouth team to a scoreless tie. 
The next week Brockton tipped Weymouth 13-12 on a muddy field, but Weymouth 
came rolling back to take H.'ngham lor the annual Turkey Day game. When the 
last gun sounded, Weymouth had won 6, lost 4, and tied 1, with Paul Sweeney 
making his first appearance as Weymouth's football coach. Al Sheehy and Neil 
Doherty were capable managers. 

THE RECORD 



Weymouth 30 


Braintree 


Weymouth 6 


Haverhill 


Weymouth 6 


Belmont 7 


Weymouth 


Brookline 19 


Weymouth 6 


North Quincy 


Weymouth 25 


Quincy 


Weymouth 34 


Cambridge Latin 


Weymouth 7 


Arlington 13 


Weymouth 


Dedham 


Weymouth 12 


Brockton 13 


Weymouth 20 


Hingham 



c-SV, PAGE SEVENTY-SEVEN 




First Row: A. Bongazone, W. Gorman, D. Coffey (Capt.). J. Sims, M. Hynes, W. Baglow; Back Row: J. Gannon, 
(Coach), R. Canliield (Mgr.), A. Delory, F. Slattery, P. Thurston, D. Corbo. 



Basketball 



X 



he Weymouth High basketball season was exciting, if not too successful, this year. 
The team won four games and lost nine. The team was somewhat of a disappoint- 
ment to Mr. Jack Gannon because of the fact that it was composed of all veterans. 
Most of the other South Shore teams had as many returning veterans as Weymouth; 
so the competition was stiffer than it has been in recent years. The team was out- 
classed on only a few occasions. Most of the games were fairly close, and the scores 
could have gone either way. Practically the whole varsity squad is graduating this 
year, and Coach Gannon is going to be left with few players who have had varsity 
experience. Mr. Gannon will have to start from scratch again next year, but hopes 
to have a better season than the last one. 

The schedule was as follows: 



Weymouth 44 


Rockland 31 


Brockton 39 


Weymouth 30 


Weymouth 48 


Hingham 28 


Weymouth 24 


Abington 22 


North Quincy 34 


Weymouth 26 


Quincy 34 


Weymouth 25 


Quincy 55 


Weymouth 17 


North Quincy 47 


Weymouth 22 


Weymouth 32 


Abington 24 


Brockton 44 


Weymouth 30 


Braintree 28 


Weymouth 26 


Rockland 44 


Wey mouth 41 


Braintree 33 


Weymouth 28 



PAGE SEVENTY-EIGHT <\a^ 




■ -./''..J- ._*.••.■■■'<:-•'.■-__• . . • ' • • ... ' . ,*"■•;-■• . . .»•**." .'.?"*»», 

First Row: Coach Delahunt, J. Pecoraro, J. Burke, M. Hynes, W. Baglow Captain, P. Bandini, F. Loud, J. 
Coveney, R. Liva; Second Row: F. Slattery, B. Daly, A. Dewey, G. MacKinney, J. Guidice, J. Coyle, J. Reed; 
Third Row: G. Sullivan, A. Delory, F. Aiello, R. Gifford Mgr., J. McLaughlin, J. Hopey, D. Syberts, G. Trask 
Assistant Manager. 

Baseball 

ith many returning veterans in the line-up, this year's baseball team, again 
led by Coach John Delahunt, gave more than a good account of itself against all 
opposition. 

The team showed plenty of fighting spirit, and that plus determination will 
be one trait that future Weymouth teams will have to go all-out to match. Although 
there are several seniors on the team, there are enough underclassmen to give Coach 
Delahunt a well-balanced team again next year. 

The starting nine included: Captain Baglow, behind the plate; Phil Badini, 
pitcher; veterans Slattery and Hynes at first and second respectively; Sybert at 
short stop; Fred Loud at third base; and Ralph Amabile, Jim Coveney, and Joe 
Guidice completing the outfield bracket. 




PAGE SEVENTY'NINE 





r% a g r* n 



4 < 

*4 




First Row: Swan, Robertson, Ruxton, Tooze; Second Row: Coach Steele, Siroonian, Gilcreast, Labadie, Rushton, 
Herlihy, Sr. Mgr.; Back Row: Laneau, Jr., Mgr. Perrow, Hegar, Christie, Sherwood, F. Clain, Adams, Jr., Mgr. 



Wrestling 



A HE Wrestling Team, under the direction of Mr. Steele, had five matches during 
the year, all with private schools. Weymouth gave a good account oi itself against 
this opposition. The home match with Perkins Institute was atlented by a large- 
crowd that enjoyed the match very much. Weymouih won by the close score of 
1 3 to 12. Charles Bennett, a sophomore, was undefeated during the year, winning 
lour out of his five matches by pins. 

The members of the first team were: 

100 lb. Class -Dick Swan 

1 10 lb. Class — Captain Stanley Robertson 

1 2 1 lb. Class — Jack Bennett 

135 lb. Class — Joe Kezer 

145 lb. Class — George Labadie 

155 lb. Class — Leo Siroonian 

165 lb. Class — Frank Gilcreast 

1 75 lb. Class — Ken Heger 

Managers were: 

"Ed" Adams, Towels 
"Scat" Herlihy, Scorer 
"Art" Teneau, Timer 



PAGL- EIGHTY «\&^ 




First Row: Dallas Knight. John Donovan, William Luscombe Ex-Capt.. George Gould Cant., Milton Watts, Robert 
Kjellnian. Albert Sheehan, Richard Liva, Robert Lyons; Second Row: Roger Freeman, Patrick Robinson, Lester 
Veno, Carlton MacKenzie Capt.-elect; Francis Newcotnb, Robert Stitt. Dewey Santacroce, Warren Porter, 
Coach Oral Page; Third Row: Edward Aleutian, Donald Swan, Paul Estabrook, William Montgomery, Richard 
Karnan, Albert McClusky. John Galium, llenrv Minasian; Fourth Row: Mgr. Jacob Nenon, Asst Mgr. Carl 
Heger, John Henry, William Mills, Peter Johnson, Arnold Lasse. 



Track 



U nder the direction of Mr. Page, our Track Team, the captain of which was 
George Gould, has had a successful year. The winter team was one of the best ever 
turned out by Coach Oral Page. There were only two dual meets in the winter, 
both of which Weymouth won easily. In the Northeastern Meet, Weymouth beat 
all of the "B" teams entered, and all but three of the "A" teams. The greatest 
achievement of the year was the taking of the class "B" state championship at the 
state meet in Boston, nosing out Cambridge Latin by one half a point. The cham- 
pionship trophy was dedicated to Robert "Guilder" Dominy who entered the Army 
Air Corps one hour before the starling time of the state meet. 

The spring season, so far, has been almost equally as good. Up to date Wey- 
mouth has won five out of five dual meets and the South Shore Interscholastic. In 
the spring slate meet Weymouth lied lor second place with Belmont, while Cam- 
bridge Latin won. 

Cross Country was less successful than track. While Bob Dominy took first in 
all nine of our dual meets, the opponents came in close enough behind him to win 
seven of the them. We scored wins over Brookline and Everett Vocational and came 
in fifth in the state meet. 

With a number of veterans, including Captain Roger Freeman and letterman 
Francis Ncwcomb, Weymouth is looking forward to a winning season next year. 



c5A, PAGE EIGHTY-ONE 




We, the students of the Class of 1945, 
Bequeath to the next Senior Class to arrive, 
To the teachers and principals, home rooms and halls 
To the Johnnies and Helens and Marys and Pauls, 
The following decree with all sorts of pity, 
Signed and sealed by the Class Will Committee: 
First, Mr. Whittle, who we think is a "pip;" 
In fact, we'll bequeath him a twenty-foot whip. 
We'll leave to Lyons, whose speech is so fluent, 
The honorable title of "Weymouth High's Truant." 
For Miss White there's a place down deep in our hearts; 
We leave her a target and many a dart. 
The part of the "Type Queen" Miss Silverman plays. 
We bequeath her a rod to pull down the shades. 
To the clever pedagogue of 215 
History's the subject in which he's keen- 
To hide in blushes, we students scheme 
To leave him the best of foundation cream. 
To Miss Canning, our friend in 216, 
Who's always good-natured, kind and serene, 
We leave her messieurs and mademoiselles 
To obey whatever Madame compells. 
We bequeath to Miss Norris in 217 
A ten-foot pole that is long and lean, 
To tap on the shoulder of "Pokey Liz" 
To make her alert about her "biz." 
To resourceful Miss Chase we bequeath, if we may, 
Millions of boys for her Senior Class Play. 



PAGL ; EIGHTY-TWO 



To Miss Pearson, who brightens up 224, 

And keeps it alive with fun galore, 

vVe leave that spirit of amusing joy 

To keep contented each girl and each boy. 

To the force in the Office we give these to use 

Five hundred and six pairs of good walking shoes. 

To the Trade School students, whom we do not forget, 

We leave them to carry on without regret. 

To Mr. Clarke, head oi the Sheet Metal Course, 

We leave a group of freshman for him to boss. 

To Messrs. Bryan and Bacon of the Auto Repair, 

We leave more mechanics to "get in their hair". 

To Mr. Whittemore, the boss oi Room 3 

We leave a wooden rule for his company. 

To Messrs. Duncan and Malm, two men of good will, 

We leave a new lin o-type to draw out each bill. 

To Mr. Sherwood who, we all think, is lucky, 

We leave Shirley Rideout, so clever, so plucky, 

To our own Mr. Whipple we leave a new class 

That will cause him more worries than the one that had passed. 

We leave a large whip to kind Mr. Boland 

For the pupils who forgot whatever he told them. 

To Mr. Kyhn, in the Sheet Metal trade, 

We leave the patience to stand the tenth grade. 

To Mr. Hawley, a brand new rule 

For his second year at the vocational school. 

To Mr. Parker, now rid of us boys, 

We will the remembrance of our problems and noise. 

To Room 3, we leave a huge book of knowledge, 

To start the boys on their way through college. 

To Room 21 1, a grand thermostat, 

One never too cold and never too hot. 

For Room 212, a huge closet, by golly, 

To make jealous such friends, "Fibber McGee and Molly." 

For noon study in Room 215, we leave 

A movable lunch counter, seemingly in need. 

In Room 210 to Mademoiselle, 

Who finds her pupils hard to quell, 

For those who after us will come 

We leave a basket made just for gum. 

To pupils of 217 we give 

Machines that might help them to live, 



<^v> PAGE EIGHTY-THREE 



For our poor heads are tired of our turn to clean; 

So we leave you a mechanical board-washing machine. 

It's Miss Chase we leave to room 2 IK, 

Whose remarks, indeed are really most keen, 

We also leave a microphone, 

So she can pick up the undertone. 

The next class in entering Room 224, 

As we did only one short year before, 

To those zestful juniors, "Hep to Jive", 

We leave the gay .spirit of '45. 

To the future musicians of Weymouth High's Band 

We give our artist, the best in the land. 

We leave to the girls, who will cheer on the team, 

Our cheerleaders' spirit, which ever shall beam. 

To the football team when they're knocked to one knee 

We leave you the fight of Joe Coveny . 

Last but not least, we have one more gift. 

We know it will give every student a lift. 

To every last room in the good old school 

A sharpener for pencils we now make a rule. 

Thus, we have finished this masterpiece, 

And now, if you wish, you may call the police. 

We've tried to bequeath to you all a fine gift; 

We've struggled and sweated to give you a lift; 

And now we command the next class to be still. 

Don't ever use poems for your Senior Class Will. 




' i »: 



PAGE EIGHTY-FOUR <w 



ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 



WILLIAM WESTLAND & CO. 



1555 HANCOCK STREET 



QUINCY , MASSACHUSETTS 



BRYANT & STRATTON 

The Commercial School of Boston 
334 BOYLSTON STREET, ^BOSTON, 16 

A sound Commercial Training directs your education into practical channels! 
It gives you a head start in the world of business or industry. It is the rock bottom 
foundation of extra earning power and quick advancement. 
Bryant & Stratton commercial courses are designed to give you the extra ad- 
vantages that you need in your future business career. For 81 years Bryant & 
Stratton graduates have been successful in the business world. You, too, can 
take a direct and practical route to business success, with Bryant & Stratton 
training. 

Diploma Courses — Stenographic, Secretarial, ' Tumor ■ Executive, . Junior 
Accounting, Business Administration, Mechanical Accounting. 
Single intensive subjects — Typewriting, Shorthand, Accounting 
(Beginning, Brush-up or Advanced) 
WRITE FOR DAY OR EVENING OR SUMMER CATALOG 
RICHARD H. BLAISDEU. Pmidant 



cTSi* PAGE EIGHTY-FIVE 



PbymOUTH ROCK 

ICE CREHUI 



Served Exclusively in Our Cafeteria 



PNEUMATIC SCALE CORP. Ltd. 



Manufacturers of 



Packing and Bottling Machinery 

65 NEWPORT AVENUE 
NORTH QUINCY, MASS. 



(Factory located directly behind Norfolk Downs R. R. Station) 



PAGE EIGHTY-SIX <\a^ 





C. R. Olden, Reg. Phar., Ph.C. 


EUGENE'S 


Jacqueline Ulden, Keg. Phar., b.b. 


TAILOR SHOP 


OLDEN'S 


EAST WEYMOUTH, MASS. 


PHARMACY 






Made^toMeasure Suits 


Jc rcacriijinjii 




OLJcLldllala 








CLEANING PRESSING 


1 UNION STREET 


ALTERATIONS 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 




Phone 0187 


C. L. McGAW 


L- L. bhepherd 










NEWSDEALER 




and 


WEYMOUTH 


STATIONER 


and 




HINGHAM 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 




MASS. 





PAGE EIGHTY-SEVEN 



vO.Hk 



To a Cjirl Qraduattj 




If employed at the Telephone Company you'll 
be helping to win the war, because communi- 
cations is one of the most essential wartime 
industries. At the same time you will earn good 
money under pleasant working conditions. 

Here is an opportunity offering you far more 
than "just a place to work." Girls of the Senior 
Class should investigate this opportunity. Train- 
ing courses may be arranged so as not to inter- 
fere with studies or graduation. Girls in the 
Junior Class are welcome to make inquiries look- 
ing to employment later on. 

Good salary from the time you start training, 
and prospects for advancement. Whether you 
stay with us a few years or many, you will find 
the wholesome, congenial atmosphere of tele- 
phone work abundantly worth while. 

Your teacher or vocational advisor can tell you 
more about work in this interesting industry. 

NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPANY 



PAGE EIGHTY-EIGHT ^ 



ARTHUR M. JUSTICE 


Veruna 


Hardware 

782 Broad Street 


Coffee Shoppe 


East Weymouth 87, Mass. 
Tel. Wey. 0773-M 


67 POND STREET 
SOUTH WEYMOUTH, MASS. 


FREE DELIVERY 




TC i ten Ptiwarp and d^fn^n 

Supplies 
Carmote Paint and 


breakiast .Served 
All Home Cooking 


Varnishes 




South Weymouth 


Compliments of 


1. G. A. 


NADELL'S 
MARKET 






82 POND STREET 




SO. WEYMOUTH, MASS. 


PARK AVENUE 


Wey. 0519 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 



c^v» PAGE EIGHTY'NINE 



WALTER A. FEELEY CO. 

Oldsmobile — Cadillac 
Sales — Service 

80 Pond Street, South Weymouth Depot 

Tel. Wey. 0915 

USED CARS BOUGHT AND SOLD 



LOUISE'S 


Charles T. Leavitt 


RESTAURANT 


Company 






The Best Place 
in Town 


Anthracite Coal 


to Eat 


New England Coke 




Range and Fuel Oils 


858 BROAD STREET 




EAST WEYMOUTH 




Tel. 1677 


Office Whaf St. 


LOUISE WILLIAMS, Prop. 


Wcy. 0019 



PAGE NINETY <\2^ 





Telephone President 7666 


ELBRIDGE NASH 


Talbot'Quincy 


DRUG CO. 






Ulll L/d.11 y 




Oualttv Clotlips, fof IVTpn 




ana Youno IVTpn 


COLUMBIAN SQUARE 


at Reasonable Prices 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 






1387 HANCOCK STREET 


MASS. 






QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 


Asphalt Tile Rubber rile Rugs Broadloom 




Johnson's Wax Linoleum Wall Covering 




Counter Work Congoleums 






Compliments 


General 


of 


Mooring Co- 




flooring 


NORFOLK 


CONTRACTORS 




745 BROAD STREET 


MOTORS 


EAST WEYMOUTH, MASS. 




Vito DeLuca 




Tel. Wey. 1039-W 





c^V, PAGE NINETY-ONE 





BEST WISHES 


UNITED 


to the 




CLASS of '45 

from the entire 




personnel at 


t 

281 BRIDGE STREET 


REMICK'S 


NORTH WEYMOUTH 


1517 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY, MASS. 


GERTRUDE'S 


CORBO BROS. 

751 BROAD STREET 
EAST WEYMOUTH 


BEAUTY SHOP 






FREE DELIVERY 




SEA STREET 


Meats * Groceries 


NORTH WEYMOUTH 


Telephone 2026-1485 



PAGE NINETY-TWO 'xa^ 



Smith's Book Store 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 
Greeting Cards - Gifts - Novelties 


Cameo Beauty Salon 

Individual Feather Cuts 

Velva'in'hot Oil and 
Machincless Permancnts 

Expert Hair Styling 

Columbian Sq., South Weymouth 

Cameo Theatre Building Wey. 2 193 


Bellingham Hardware Co. 

Inc. 

Washington Square 
Weymouth 

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


Tel. Wey. 2228 




Donovan Drug Co. 

Weymouth 


Congratulations 


DELIVERY SERVICE 


to the 

Class of 1945 


I . BLOOM AND SON 




GROCERIES AND 
PROVISIONS 

Lincoln Square, Weymouth 

Tel. Wey. 0248 


WEYMOUTH HIGH 
SCHOOL TEACHERS 



c^V, PAGE NINETY'THREE 



Duncan MacKellar 

M. P. Garey Agency 


Best of Luck 


INSURANCE 

of 

Every Description 


FRAN'S 
DRESS SHOP 

792 BROAD STREET 


EAST WEYMOUTH 
JACKSON SQUARE 

Tel. Wey. 1170 


"Better Apparel 

For Women" 


umrs 


PHARMACY, Inc. 

804 - 806 Broad Street 
East Weymouth, Mass. 


The 


Ihe 

Rexall Stores 


Greeting Card 


SERVING 


Center 


OUUU a ILc VjiCclIIl 

Charles M. Lister, Reg. Pharmacist 
Manager 



PAGE NINETY-FOUR 





Good Luck 


Bernard G. Tirrell 


to the 

Graduating Class 


JEWELER 


of 1945 


"71 \X/ A CI— f TI\J/'~"TV\1VT CTDCCT 

/I W /VorllrNij 1 U1N a 1 Keel 
WEYMOUTH, MASS. 


SHEPPARD COAL 
AND OIL CO. 

Weymouth Landing 

Tel. 2700 


Harry b. Lummmgs 




REGISTERED PHARMACIST 




Weymouth Landing 


best ot Luck 


Druggist 


from the 


WE WILL NOT BE 




KNOWINGLY UNDERSOLD 

Braintree Town Prescriptions 
may be filled at our store. 


Junior Class 


Wey. 1525 





c^V, PAGE NINETY-FIVE 



PRIDE IN PRESCRIPTIONS 


Compliments 


Charles C. Hearn 


of 


1 he Kexall btore 

416 BRIDGE STREET 
NORTH WEYMOUTH, MASS. 

Tel. 3331 -0405 -0616 -0381 


PIONEER 
FOOD 
b 1 UKb 


THREE REGISTERED DRUGGISTS 


Weymouth Heights 


Compliments 


UNITED 
Burner Service 


of 

CAIN'S 

LOBSTER 
HOUSE 


Silent Glow 
Oil Burners 

Heating . . . Stokes 
Electrical Appliances 
Practical Shower and 
Wedding Gifts 

JACKSON SQUARE 
EAST WEYMOUTH 

Tel. Wey. 1630 



PAGE NINETY'SIX 



■ 

if